D1 – Dialogues: Paris, France – 2015

July 25, 2017

Dialogues: Paris, France - 2015

Dialogues: Paris, France - 2015: Day 1

 

Welcome & Introductions

10:00 - 12:30

The Equator Prize 2015 events began with a warm welcome from Mr. Rinataro Tamaki, Deputy Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) who graciously hosted the first two days of community dialogues. Eileen de Ravin, Manager of the Equator Initiative, introduced the Equator Prize winners to the three moderators of the community dialogues: Alejandra Pero, Esther Muiru, and Japy Silapan.

The community members introduced themselves by completing the phrase “I’m proud of my work because…” through illustrations. Winners from Malaysia and Indonesia summarized their collective work as “preserving and conserving the flora and fauna, [for] it is where our livelihood comes from.” Patrick Saidi Hemedi from the Democratic Republic of Congo introduced his organization alongside those from Vietnam and Madagascar and stated unity within their communities as the most important feature shared across their cultures.

After establishing guidelines to create rich engagement during the dialogues, the prize winners received the complete program for their time in Paris. Alejandra Pero then presented the priority areas of the United Nations Development Program and explained the role of the Equator Initiative to celebrate local action by indigenous peoples and offer the global visibility it deserves.

Martin Sommerschuh of the Equator Initiative explained the process since the call for nominations until present and placed the Equator Prize 2015 in context of the 1461 nominations from 126 countries. The extensive verification process yielding the 21 winners was detailed underscoring the prestige of the award.

Gabriella Ramos, OECD Chief of Staff, shared the organisation’s mandate of promoting better policies for better lives and highlighted climate as a critical policy concern. OECD works to support local communities like Equator Prize winners by offering governments best practices in incentivizing quicker adaptation to climate change. The communities discovered the breadth of OECD’s work and received publications relevant to their efforts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

OECD morning 1 smaller

OECD 1.2 small

 

 

OECD lunch 1.2

OECD lunch table

OECD lunch DRC smallest

OECD lunch 1.1

OECD Multi-Stakeholder Luncheon

12:30 PM – 14:00 PM

During the first day of community dialogues, participants attended a multi-stakeholder luncheon hosted by the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). During the lunch, Equator Prize 2015 winners were introduced to high-profile stakeholders from their countries, allowing them to share their voices and stories, and inform national policy formation. The OECD Secretary General, Angel Gurria, and the Equator Initiative Manager, Eileen de Ravin, offered words of welcome to over 100 guests and thanked the winners for serving as daily inspiration.

H.E. Mr Hotmangaradja Pandjaitan, the Indonesian Ambassador to France, expressed his nation’s pride of their three Equator Prize 2015 winners. He stated his government’s commitment to combat climate change and underscored the importance of these local communities to achieve success as a nation. Dorothy Groth, Counsellor of the Permanent Delegation of Germany to the OECD, expressed the pleasure of the German government to support the Equator Initiative within its larger efforts to protect biodiversity and respond to climate change.

Patrick Saidi, from La Dynamique des Groupes des Peuples Autochtones in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), addressed the group on behalf of the 2015 winners. He explained his organisation’s work to improve recognition of indigenous pygmies’ rights in Congolese legislation and forest protection. He also explained how winning the Equator Prize increased government recognition of their work, including an invitation to be part of the Congolese official delegation for COP21. A short film featuring the work of the Bamboo Village of Phu An in Vietnam illustrated how winning the Equator Prize 2010 has enabled them to scale their efforts in reducing carbon emissions while creating new employment opportunities.

A series of remarks by OECD experts was led by the Senior Advisor to the Secretary General, and Coordinator of the Knowledge Sharing Alliance and the Inclusive Growth Initiative, Lamia Kamal-Chaoui, who nuanced the importance of linking policy and practice, and using knowledge from local and indigenous communities to inform OECD’s analysis.

Mario Pezzini, Director of the OECD Development Centre, talked about the different OECD programs in developing countries and the significances of including local communities, especially woman, in government programs to ensure success. Katia Karousakis, from the Climate Change, Biodiversity and Development Division, of the OECD Environment Directorate underscored the synergy between local action and global policy to preserve biodiversity. Xavier Leflaive, head of the water unit at the OECD Environment Directorate, stressed the importance of water to all: developed and developing nations, and emphasized the need for the OECD vision to include both scientific approaches and traditional approaches in their studies. Ms. Kamal-Chaoui concluded the event reinforcing that local success must inform global solutions, as we build a path to a sustainable future.

During the first day of community dialogues, participants attended a multi-stakeholder luncheon hosted by the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). During the lunch, Equator Prize 2015 winners were introduced to high-profile stakeholders from their countries, allowing them to share their voices and stories, and inform national policy formation. The OECD Secretary General, Angel Gurria, and the Equator Initiative Manager, Eileen de Ravin, offered words of welcome to over 100 guests and thanked the winners for serving as daily inspiration.

H.E. Mr Hotmangaradja Pandjaitan, the Indonesian Ambassador to France, expressed his nation’s pride of their three Equator Prize 2015 winners. He stated his government’s commitment to combat climate change and underscored the importance of these local communities to achieve success as a nation. Dorothy Groth, Counsellor of the Permanent Delegation of Germany to the OECD, expressed the pleasure of the German government to support the Equator Initiative within its larger efforts to protect biodiversity and respond to climate change.

Patrick Saidi, from La Dynamique des Groupes des Peuples Autochtones in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), addressed the group on behalf of the 2015 winners. He explained his organisation’s work to improve recognition of indigenous pygmies’ rights in Congolese legislation and forest protection. He also explained how winning the Equator Prize increased government recognition of their work, including an invitation to be part of the Congolese official delegation for COP21. A short film featuring the work of the Bamboo Village of Phu An in Vietnam illustrated how winning the Equator Prize 2010 has enabled them to scale their efforts in reducing carbon emissions while creating new employment opportunities.

A series of remarks by OECD experts was led by the Senior Advisor to the Secretary General, and Coordinator of the Knowledge Sharing Alliance and the Inclusive Growth Initiative, Lamia Kamal-Chaoui, who nuanced the importance of linking policy and practice, and using knowledge from local and indigenous communities to inform OECD’s analysis.

Mario Pezzini, Director of the OECD Development Centre, talked about the different OECD programs in developing countries and the significances of including local communities, especially woman, in government programs to ensure success. Katia Karousakis, from the Climate Change, Biodiversity and Development Division, of the OECD Environment Directorate underscored the synergy between local action and global policy to preserve biodiversity. Xavier Leflaive, head of the water unit at the OECD Environment Directorate, stressed the importance of water to all: developed and developing nations, and emphasized the need for the OECD vision to include both scientific approaches and traditional approaches in their studies. Ms. Kamal-Chaoui concluded the event reinforcing that local success must inform global solutions, as we build a path to a sustainable future.

Past Winners' Experiences & Elevator Pitches

14:00 PM – 16:30 PM

OECD afternoon 1.2
Nicholas & Faye Fredricks from Guyana

OECD afternoon 1.1
Yawanawa Lui from Brazil

OECD afternoon 1.3
Rahima Njaidi & Revocatus Njau from Tanzania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equator Prize winners from years past joined the 2015 winners to offer best practices on leveraging the prize to scale their work. Yawanawa Lui from the Sociocultural Association of Yawanawá greeted the winners by performing a song from his community. He shared how winning the prize in 2008 brought his organization to the awareness of the government and also him to gain financial sponsorship for the future. Houssin Nibani of Association de Gestion Intégrée des Ressources explained how the scope of his organization’s work has expanded since winning the Equator Prize last year. Not only has their work shifted from one national park to the entire coast of Morocco, but they have also taken on a stronger leadership role to encourage replication of their work by local people.

Following these inspiring accounts, the new winners learned the importance of honing an elevator pitch to share their stories with depth and brevity. Hernando Chindoy from Colombia attempted the first pitch and presented the importance of naming themselves as Equator Prize winners. In her elevator speech, Rahima Njaidi from Tanzania included specific numbers to illustrate success and stated clear goals for the future. Sopheap Hoeun from Cambodia mentioned the methods his community uses to achieve their aims including nonviolence practices, technology and social media. Cristina Coc from Belize offered advice on differentiating one’s work when seeking sponsorship. Other suggestions included detailing focus on marginalized groups and listing other sponsors or partnerships.

A reflection at the end of the day spurred desire to speak directly with government delegations. Pablo Miss from Belize emphasized the importance of thinking globally while acting locally. He urged the communities to concentrate on the opportunity to learn from each other to scale their work, independent of government support. Participants reflected on the first day of community dialogues by sharing a highlight and a suggestion moving forward. The dialogues concluded with a song performed by Patxon Metuktir from Brazil.

 


 

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