Hands on and practical training with evaluations and certification of wildlife tracking traditional knowledge training by Khwe elders to youth

August 7, 2017

Namibia Placeholder
Namibia

Hands on and practical training with evaluations and certification of wildlife tracking traditional knowledge training by Khwe elders to youth

About the Implementing organization

Name: Kyaramacan Peoples Association

Country: Namibia

Year of establishment: 2006

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Legally recognized non-profit status, Indigenous group or organization, Ethnic minority group or association

Description

KA supports the TEKOA Trust as a pioneering centre for learning and cultural exchange to recognise, preserve and disseminate invaluable traditional knowledge (TK). It is a place where indigenous community elders with their expert knowledge are fittingly recognised as the professors. However, it is much more than a university in the forest. By drawing on the unique, valuable and applicable TK, it helps to shape a more prosperous and sustainable future. In doing so, it provides a revival for culture, community and conservation and a means for a people who are the specialists of survival in the natural world to both survive and thrive in the modern world, realising their full wisdom, skills and potential. This innovative approach is all about building bridges of restoration, one component being between traditional and modern knowledge systems by putting community & TK at the heart of environmental and protected area management. Resident Training, whch involves ocal residents, particularly youth, while professional training involves conservationists, guides and practitioners.
A learning and cultural experiences includes tourists, schools and international knowledge and science exchanges. Connecting youth to employment opportunities that require traditional skills and helping to achieve education, social, economic, indigenous and ecological policy priorities. Local solutions to global challenges and the TEKOA Trust model which can be applied around the world.

Nature Element

Forests / Wetlands / Grasslands / Drylands / Wildlife

Type of Action

Protection / Restoration / Sustainable use / Access and benefit sharing / Awareness and education

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

    

Environmental Impacts

Even with KA employing 71 people in the Park, unemployment rates stand at around 97%. Even with KA employing 71 people in the Park, unemployment rates stand at around 97%. The mission is a revival in conservation, towards community empowerment through education, employment, economic incentives and the application of successful TK practices.
The TEKOA Trust training leads to improved wildlife monitoring and protection, also employment.• More than 310 adults and 85 youth trained• More than 170 school children exposed to tracking and ecology experiences• 22 trackers achieved Level 1 CyberTracker certificates (70-79%)• 16 trackers achieved Level 2 (80-89%)• 6  trackers achieved Level 3 (90-99%)• 2 trackers achieved Professional Tracker Level (100%)• 17 community members have found employment as a direct result of the TEKOA training.A new joint environmental education partnership has been secured between EduVentures and KA. The Ministry is in the final process to employ at least 15 KA members as specialists with traditional knowledge and tracking skills.

Sustainable Development Impacts

The TEKOA Trust has a far reaching impact at the local, national and global level.
Local. Connecting youth to employment opportunities that require traditional skills.
National. Helping to achieve education, social, economic, indigenous and ecological policy priorities.
Global. Local solutions to global challenges and the TEKOA model which can be applied around the world.

Educationn. TEKOA provides the widest possible range of economic and social opportunities for students, teachers and the local community.
Livelihood. It provides a valuable resource in creating and sustaining livelihoods, helping to increase employability for youth in tourism and environmental and wildlife management.
Conservation. Some 45 commuity members have official certification, now more park residents are aware and part of securing the parks natural resources. The community is developing with KA a Khwe Living Museum that will provide significant income and training opportunities for the local community.

Scalability

TEKOA helps the Namibian State and nation to meet many of its key policy priorities;
The Harambee Prosperity Plan (April 2016) the need for development which is “people centered and inclusive” and “fast tracking development in areas where progress is insufficient”.
The objectives of the draft National Development Plan 5 (2017) to promote a sustainable society that is worthy of human dignity by empowering marginalized groups, women and men, marginalized San communities need special attention.
The Second National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan which states that the “traditional knowledge of Namibian communities needs to be carefully harnessed and regulated so that these communities benefit to a greater extent from their biodiversity-related expertise”.
The BNP Management Plan which seeks to “engage with custodians of indigenous knowledge to use this information for environmental education”.

Ongoing efforts are underway to engage with Government to further establish this effort.

Replicability

Visits to Angola, Botswana, Kenya, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa emphasised strongly to desire and need to replicate this effort.
The depth of indigenous TK rooted in the long inhabitation of a particular place offers lessons that can benefit everyone, from educator to scientist, as we search for more satisfying and sustainable ways to live on this planet.
This is acknowledged by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples which explicitly notes the link between the recognition of indigenous knowledge and potential environmental, economic and social benefits. The declaration states that “respect for indigenous knowledge, cultures and traditional practices contributes to sustainable and equitable development and proper management of the environment.”

The KA supported TEKOA Trust is a valuable forum through which scientists, researchers, practitioners, politicians, indigenous people from around the world can share with one another and learn from one another.

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