Author: Qinyu Li

August 8, 2017

Zimbabwe Placeholder
Zimbabwe

Shashe Agroecology School

About the Implementing organization

Name: Zimbabwe Smallholder Organic Farmers Forum (ZIMSOFF)

Country: Zimbabwe

Year of establishment: 2003

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Legally recognized non-profit status, Indigenous group or organization

Description

The Sashe Agroecology school founded by ZIMSOFF works to improve the agroecology capacity of ZIMSOFF members and to stimulate local innovation for agroecology and sustainable agriculture.

The agroecokogy school does this through;

• Facilitating a farmer led learning process amongst farmers through which methods of production are explored through adiscovery based approach.
• Creating a space where farmers can regularly meet during the course of the growing season to exchange experiences and experiment with new production options
• Provide a meeting space for members from the different clusters from across the country to hold strategic planning meetings

Nature Element

Wetlands / Grasslands / Drylands

Type of Action

Protection / Restoration / Sustainable use / Access and benefit sharing / Awareness and education / Advocacy for land & water rights

Sustainable Development Element

Food security / Water security / Health / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

      

Environmental Impacts

The main environmental impact areas of the agroecology school founded by ZIMSOFF is the expansion of water conservation techniques which are crucial in a region which has just experienced a drought. Furthermore, the agroecology techniques taught at the agroecology school focus on organic and sustainable materials and practices for growing food which positively impacts soil fertility and increases the nutritional content of the food grown.

Sustainable Development Impacts

Food Security: Through the education received at the agroecology school farmers are more knowledgeable about techniques which allow for a diversity of crops to be grown on a homestead while also receiving trainings on how to grow crops which address the wholistic nutritional needs of communities.

Water Security: In a drought impacted area, the agroecology school provides trainings on water conservation while also providing a space for farmers to exchange conservation techniques.

Health: A diverse, balanced and local diet that is sustainable and accessible for communities in Zimbabawe is what the agroecology school focuses on through various trainings on farmer led seed management systems and agroecology techniques.

Climate Action: Through a focus on organic products, natural fertilizers, and Indigenous seeds the agroecology school has a climate justice lens which works to ensure that agroecology is being taught through a lens which priorities climate justice.

Scalability

Due to funding restrictions ZIMSOFF has not yet been able to replicate the agroecology school. However, there is a desire and a plan to replicate the agroecology school model in Sashe to the other clusters which ZIMSOFF members live. The reason for expanding the number of agroecology schools is so that more communities can be reached through smallholder farmer's being educated in farming techniques based on agroecology for the purposes of increasing food sovereignty and ecological sustainability across Zimbabwe.

Replicability

The Sashe agroecology school model is a part of a lineage of smallholder famers across the globe who are seeking more sustainable ways of farming so as to ensure food sovereignty for their communities. In a climate where there is increased food insecurity across the globe, the trainings that the agroecology school in Sashe provides are useful as farmer led actions aimed at maintaining health and sustainable communities. The continued success of the agroecology school in Sashe provides an example for other communities who wish to replicate this model.

Share this solution:

 


 

Equator Blog

About Equator Initiative 

Contact Us

Follow Us:       

August 8, 2017

Ghana Placeholder
Ghana

Participatory landuse planning and management

About the Implementing organization

Name: Trax Program Support

Country: Ghana

Year of establishment: 1989

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Legally recognized non-profit status, Women’s association or organization, Indigenous group or organization

Description

Landuse conflict was one of the major challenges and the results had been infighting between herdsmen and local farmers. Women farmers were denied access to land. A community land-use planning scheme using participatory tools such as resource mapping, community mapping, transect diagram and group discussions was introduced. The focus of the land-use plans was to delineate clearly agricultural lands from grazing lands, woodlot plantations, settlement lands and lands for natural regeneration. Land management committee was formed and members trained who organize periodic community fora to promote environmental awareness, change attitudes and behaviors of the people to address environmental problems. 60% of membership of the committee was women with the remaining 40% being men. Degraded lands of marginal and unproductive areas were demarcated and placed under natural regeneration. Tree species like Neem, teak, cassia and leucaena seedlings were nursed and distributed to the farmers to plant on such degraded lands. Farmers protected the demarcated area from annual wildfires, hunting and encroachment for farming activities. A central tree nursery of 50,000 seedlings production capacity was established to produce multipurpose, indigenous and exotic tree species supplied to interested farmers. Women were allowed to pick Shea nuts from the natural regeneration areas. Wetlands and riverine forests were protected from farming. Local byelaws were enacted to enforce the landuse plan.

Nature Element

Forests / Wetlands / Rivers / Grasslands / Drylands / Wildlife

Type of Action

Protection / Awareness and education / Advocacy for land & water rights

Sustainable Development Element

Food security / Water security / Disaster risk reduction / Peace and security

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

      

Environmental Impacts

The natural regeneration coupled with agroforestry and planting of multipurpose and economic trees such as moringa, grafted mangoes, leucaena and other nitrogen fixing species has rejuvenated that vegetation of the area. The application of organic farming methods has promoted sustainable soil fertility and promoted the economic value of species such as moringa and grafted mango. The moringa plant helps reduce malnutrition among children and increase incomes among farmers. The traditional improved woodstoves has reduced the fast depletion of tree cover. Reduced rate of fuel wood consumption, has helped farmers especially women were trained in the construction and use of efficient energy stoves that uses less fuel wood, produces less smoke and therefore less hazardous. The project facilitated the formation of a Fire Volunteer Squad (FVS) and members trained in fire prevention, fighting and first aid techniques to serve as watchdog committee to ensure responsible environmental behavior.

Sustainable Development Impacts

Capacity building strategies take advantage of the traditional knowledge and skills in land management. Beneficiary farmers were given practical and on-field training/demonstrations on activities such as tree nursery establishment and management, tree growing, contour identification using “A” frame and spirit level, stone bunding/grass stripping, compost preparation and improved energy saving stoves construction among others. Beneficiaries acquired additional knowledge and skills leading to the adoption and application of improved land management techniques on their fields. The project trains farmers on environmentally-based and sustainable agricultural techniques that help to improve their yields and incomes and to be more environmentally friendly. Farmers are trained in simple book-keeping and village savings and loan schemes. The project specifically engages women and youth in alternative income generating activities such as dry-season farming and artisan training.

Scalability

The project relied on traditional knowledge of farmers to complement the improved methods and techniques that were taught. Especially traditional knowledge on stone lining, compost preparation and tree growing. Farmers were therefore taught how to identify contours using different tools before lining the stones along the contour to effectively control soil erosion. This impacted significantly on the success of the project as farmers combined their traditional knowledge with additional knowledge passed on to them in land management. The project created a platform at the community level, for periodic review and allowed group members to invite their colleague non-group members to shared their experiences and facilitate the process of adoption. The CTs and opinion leaders formulated bylaws to protect the environment. The project worked with other institutions to improve the environment for crop and livestock production and introduced tree growing in adjourning project communities.

Replicability

The replication of this project to other communities in the three northern regions has contribute towards addressing land degradation and general food insecurity problems. The elements being mostly replicated and adopted are the village savings and loan scheme, training of local veterinary officers to support local livestock development, and participatory landuse planning. The Government Savannah Accelerated Development project adopted the project success interventions and used most of the farmers as resource farmers. Supporting women to invest in Shea butter processing for export has also be widely adopted in the savannah region especially in the northern region.

Share this solution:

 


 

Equator Blog

About Equator Initiative 

Contact Us

Follow Us:       

August 8, 2017

Philippines Placeholder
Philippines

INTEGRATED RICE-DUCK FARMING AND VALUE CHAIN

About the Implementing organization

Name: Women Empowerment Movement-Rural Improvement Club (WEM-RIC), Inc., Province of Zamboanga del Sur

Country: Philippines

Year of establishment: 2013

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Legally recognized non-profit status, Community enterprise or business , Women’s association or organization

Description

The integrated rice-duck farming system (IRDFS) is about growing rice and ducks together in an irrigated paddy field. The paddling movement of the ducks stimulates plant growth, while duck manure naturally fertilizes the soil. The ducks also eat the harmful insects and weeds, thus eliminating the need for pesticides and herbicides.

Based on the experience of more than 1000 rice-duck farms in the Philippines, IRDFS has increased rice productivity up to 9 tons per hectare (average is only 4.2 tons), while reducing the cost of production by 30%.

The IRDFS has also facilitated the growth of agrienterprises along an integrated rice and duck industry value chain such as rice-duck farms, duck breeder farms, hatcheries, duck meat and egg processing and retail, etc, all of which provide market-based solutions that increase the productivity, income, and overall quality of life of women and men farmers and other value chain players.

WEM-RIC is an advocate of the IRDFS and its related enterprises along the value chain, and facilitates technical assistance for farmers interested to learn and adopt the technology in their family or group farms. WEM-RIC also promotes the consumption of iron and iodine-rich duck meat, as well as duck eggs as an alternative to chicken. Duck eggs stay fresher longer, due to their thicker shell. They are also richer in albumen and contain more Omega-3 fatty acids. People who cannot eat chicken eggs due to allergies can often eat duck eggs.

Nature Element

Rivers / Grasslands

Type of Action

Restoration / Sustainable use / Access and benefit sharing / Awareness and education

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

      

Environmental Impacts

As a sustainable organic farming system, IRDFS eliminates the need for chemical fertilizers and synthetic pesticides/herbicides. Due to the elimination of synthetic inputs, the physical and chemical properties of the soil are improved over time.

As much as 21% of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide consist of methane gas that is released primarily by flooded rice fields. This is because flooding cuts off the oxygen supply to the soil and accelerates the decomposition of organic matter, releasing methane into the atmosphere. Studies in China show that ducks in the rice paddies effectively reduce the emission of the greenhouse gas methane, ultimately contributing to alleviate global warming.

While similar studies have yet to be conducted in the Philippines, it is highly probable that rice-duck farming is impacting Philippine rice paddies and its surrounding environment in the same positive manner.

Sustainable Development Impacts

About 10 WEM-RIC organizations are managing small-scale (100-150 heads) duck breeder farms. 80-90% of the mother ducks lay 1 egg each day, which are sold every 3-4 days. Egg sales are invested back to the farm to procure duck feeds and pay for labor. A portion of the sales is also set aside as income or savings of the organization. Fresh eggs can also be placed in an incubator to hatch after 28 days and sold to rice-duck farmers.

Other WEM-RIC organizations are engaged in duck egg retail. This enterprise is about procuring fresh eggs and adding value by processing them into balut (a popular street food) or salted eggs. Members take on different roles in processing, cooking, and selling the eggs.

Even duck manure can be a source of income. In some of the breeder farms, the liquid duck manure is collected and mixed with rice hull and sold as fertilizer. One women’s group has also experimented using the manure in a small biogas digester to produce natural fuel for cooking.

Scalability

Rice production has always been important to the food supply of the country. Since the mid-1960s, the Philippine government has invested in the cultivation of high yielding rice varieties. It also undertook a major expansion of the nation’s irrigation systems, which grew from under 500,000 hectares to 1.5 million or almost half of the country’s potentially irrigable land in 2009. Despite these efforts, rice productivity remains low. Many farmers are in debt because of the rising prices of agricultural inputs, namely chemical-based fertilizers and pesticides, which are still widely used.

Rice-duck farming has great potential to solve these problems but it requires a robust duck industry. Fortunately, the high demand for balut and salted duck eggs has triggered the emergence of local duck industries in Luzon and Mindanao such as in Bukidnon Province. What is important too is for these industries to be inclusive, ensuring that small farmers are engaged and benefit from the value chain.

Replicability

Developed by Japanese organic farmer Takao Furuno in 1988, the IRDFS was introduced in the Philippines in 1997 by Jose Apollo Pacamalan, a Filipino organic farming and rural development advocate and practitioner, who met Furuno in the Philippines and went to Japan to learn the technology. Other countries such as Korea, China, Nepal and Bangladesh have since adopted the IRDFS.

The proliferation of duck enterprises due to the high local demand for duck eggs (mainly because of balut), however, remains unique to the Philippines. While this rural development business model may not be applicable in other countries, others can explore other market-driven solutions that are more appropriate to their context. An example is the large demand for duck meat (Peking duck) in Japan and China.

Share this solution:

 


 

Equator Blog

About Equator Initiative 

Contact Us

Follow Us:       

August 8, 2017

Botswana Placeholder
Botswana

Pathways to Coexistence: Facilitating appropriate land use planning that considers protecting major elephant corridors

About the Implementing organization

Name: SThe Ecoexist Project

Country: Botswana

Year of establishment: 2013

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Legally recognized non-profit status, Community enterprise or business , Cooperative business, Women’s association or organization

Description

The eastern Okavango Delta Panhandle in northern Botswana is home to approximately 15,000 elephants and just over 15,000 people. Both populations are increasing and competition between people and elephants over space, water and food is high. Historically, government land boards allocate arable lands to farmers close to the river and effectively reduced the space available for elephants to move to and access resources in the Okavango. Consequently, elephants have been restricted to restricted pathways. Research conducted by Ecoexist Director, Anna Songhurst, confirms conflict increases dramatically close to these corridors. Ecoexist has collaborated with the communities in the area, the land board authority, other government stakeholders and USAID to designate thirteen of the largest and most important corridors on in the Okavango Panhandle. The process used the GIS based 'Land Use Conflict Identification Strategy' model (LUCIS), which holds at its core the input, through participation by the community, of local resource and land use needs and preferences. Model development involved several years of consultation, expert GIS mapping and frequent exchange with stakeholders. The model also incorporates other land use conflicts, and sustainable benefit generating activities in the corridors, resulting in a comprehensive land use plan and map that guides future land allocation. This was officially endorsed, as land allocation policy, by the governments land authority in 2016.

Nature Element

Forests / Wetlands / Wildlife

Type of Action

Protection / Sustainable use / Mainstreaming into sectors

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

    

Environmental Impacts

The 13 elephant corridors that were protected each cover at least 2km by 7km of prime natural woodland habitat, in order that elephants can move freely between arable lands and settlements. They also protect the forest and other biodiversity within the corridors and secure safe passage for countless other large and small mammals, reptiles and birds. There has also been an increased awareness around the elephant corridors by the local community, changing behaviour and increasing tolerance toward elephants.

Sustainable Development Impacts

Development in the area has now adopted a sustainable development approach, incorporating the needs of both people and the elephants and other wildlife of the area for resources and space in this socio-ecological landscape. There are now opportunities to separate arable lands from elephant corridors, using landscape level mitigation techniques to encourage elephants to use pathways and stay away from fields and crops. In addition, alternative livelihood options arise in the form of eco-tourism potential in these corridors and associated spin off industry. The produce harvested from the fields in cluster fields, effectively protected and away from the elephant corridors are now branded "elephant aware" and are being marketed and sold at a premium to the nearby tourism industry. These enterprise opportunities are forming the basis of the development of an "Elephant Economy" in the area.

Scalability

The land authorities have requested Ecoexist to conduct similar corridor identification and elephant movement analysis on the western side of the Okavango delta, in order to initiate the same land use planning process and planning map development there too. There is growing recognition for the need for this as part of a holistic strategy to reduce wildlife conflict, promote human wildlife coexistence, increase food security and generate alternative livelihood opportunities in a sustainable development approach. The LUCIS process and resulting land use plan map has also been endorsed by the Ministry of Lands and was recently included in the countries National Development Plan, No. 11.

Replicability

Work on the western side of the Okavango has already begun to identify elephant corridors and develop the LUCIS model in collaboration with the communities surrounding an additional three sub-district land board offices. The process is still ongoing and the District land board authority has plans to roll it out to another two sub-districts in Ngamiland (the Okavango Delta region).

Share this solution:

 


 

Equator Blog

About Equator Initiative 

Contact Us

Follow Us:       

August 8, 2017

Indonesia Placeholder
Indonesia

Conservaiton Compact A: Integrated Coastal Management to Improve Climate Change Adaptability and Reduce Emissions from Mangrove Forest Conversion

About the Implementing organization

Name: Yayasan Planet Indonesia

Country: Indonesia

Year of establishment: 2012

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Legally recognized non-profit status, Women’s association or organization, Indigenous group or organization

Description

This innovative project uses fish ecology and community-services to drive climate change adaptation and mitigation. Currently, over 2.6 billion people on earth rely on fisheries as a primary source of protein and economic income. Moreover, 97% of the world’s fisheries reside in developing countries. Area and time closures (ATCs or Temporary Marine Reserves/TMRs) is an effective management strategy for communities which rely on marine populations as a primary sustaining resource. Under this strategy small sections of coastal areas are temporary closed, allowing for fish stocks to replenish before opening for harvest once again. Utilizing ecological principles and the fast-rate-of-return of marine populations, our temporary closure system helps communities recognize the value of preserving coastal habitats that are necessary for marine population persistence. This management system is combined with a communal business group targeting over 200 fishermen. Through this group we also implement literacy training and family planning, and are developing a savings and loans program. Through this approach community members wishing to gain access to these services must agree to also follow the TMRs system. Our innovative approach provides incentives and rewards for adopting new conservation strategies and resource management plans.

Nature Element

Forests / Coasts

Type of Action

Protection / Restoration / Sustainable use

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security / Disaster risk reduction / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

      

Environmental Impacts

The long-term outcome of TMRs is for communities to recognize the value of protecting coastal mangrove forest and developing a community-based system for harvesting marine resources. Ultimately, TMRs are positioned and designed to be the first step to incentivize villagers to permanently close and protect areas (community-based marine reserves/CBMRs) as they receive continued benefit from this integrated approach. With a rough estimate from previous research in the above ground biomass (note this does not take into account below ground storage), mangroves in West Borneo store about 300 Megagrammes of carbon per hectare (Mg/ha). For 5000 hectares of forests we will protect this equals 1,500,000,000 kilograms of carbon per hectare(Kg/ha). This is roughly equal to the emissions 316,850 passenger vehicles driven for one year or 168,786,867 gallons of gasoline. consumed (data from: EPA Carbon Sequestration Converter)

Sustainable Development Impacts

In tandem with creating TMRs this project will facilitate the setup of communal businesses for fishermen which will create economic incentives for responsible fishing and reduce the destruction of these highly threatened ecosystems. These business groups act as the platform for which we facilitate and implement the positioning and creation of these temporary closures. Because family members have access to savings and loans programs, skills mentoring, and benefits from the communal business group although our initial target is 200 business members based on average family size we estimate indirect beneficiaries to be well over 1250 individuals. These communal businesses are directly linked with sustainable development as they increase the community's income, reduce the costs of accessing markets and make the communities more self-reliant. Under the this model we invest in community developed reserves and protected areas to help communities protect forests and get out of poverty.

Scalability

This model has already been shown to go to scale by a similar organization, Blue Ventures, in Africa. This communal business approach builds self-reliance in communities and creates economic safety nets through the savings and loans programs. Moreover, Area and Time Closures can be used in any coastal or marine ecosystem as it is based on the fast rate of return of marine and freshwater species. Planet Indonesia invests in communities heavily for a 3-5 year period to create these conservation compacts, but after that uses funds from donors to expand our project's reach. Planet Indonesia was developed to scale up this model as in many ways we are already past the pilot phase. Our model was first tested with indigenous women and the program grew from 25 to over 1500. Currently, that communal business group is completely separate from our organization and has reached full financial independence.

Replicability

Our organization is currently in the process of testing our model against other issues. We have proven it as a model to preserve culture, promote indigenous women’s rights, and bring sustainable economic development to low-income communities. Our new programs will test its ability to create solutions in new sectors of work. We have already begun to show its flexibility, and because of this, our organization is proving this methods replicability. Other organizations’ can apply our communal green business model to issues that stem from human poverty. After the replicability of our model is proven we plan to scale-up, and apply our model to other areas of Southeast Asia.

Share this solution:

 


 

Equator Blog

About Equator Initiative 

Contact Us

Follow Us:       

August 8, 2017

Kenya Placeholder
Kenya

Better/Fair prices, unified advocacy for favorable decisions/policies/development decisions, better implementation of capacity building projects, Improvement of local traditional technologies

About the Implementing organization

Name: NZAUI DISTRICT SMALL SCALE FARMERS FORUM

Country: Kenya

Year of establishment: 2012

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization

Description

Initially farmers would market their products as individuals. Establishment of NSSFF created a unified forum through which farmers identify markets and bargain for fair prices. Farmers are now able to identify markets by themselves within cities rather than sell them to middle men at the farms. This ensures that farmers get better prices.Unified farmers are able to supply adequate volumes of products where they are required in large volumes, As an association the cost of transporting the produce to markets far into cities is shared among farmers hence reduced resulting in higher income from sale of produce. Unified farmers are able to advocate and lobby for favorable policies, development decisions - the county government has responded by prioritising value adding technologies, water harvesting projects among others. It also ensures equitable distribution of development support. For example it is now asier for the country to plan and execute development support as per farmer groups cluster needs.Due to the unified associations it has been easy to plan and implement capacity building projects. For example for a beekeeping project, it was easy to plan for demonstration sites where farmers are taught from one location per cluster of farmer groups. This makes the trainings reach a wider population and with higher impacts than if farmers were not unified.

Nature Element

Forests / Mountains / Wetlands / Rivers / Drylands / Wildlife

Type of Action

Protection / Restoration / Sustainable use / Mainstreaming into sectors / Access and benefit sharing / Awareness and education / Advocacy for land & water rights

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security / Water security / Disaster risk reduction / Peace and security / Health / Renewable energy / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

                

Environmental Impacts

A lot of awareness creation has been carried out with the support of agricultural and environment officers on relevant matters such as charcoal burning/clearing of forests/leaving land bear/sand harvesting/non-distubance of wildlife etc. The African Union is supporting a beekeeping project for transitioning to modern beekeeping practices, the county government has assisted with construction of dams, sand dams have been constructed across some seasonal rivers, county government has set up a system for arresting illegal sand harvesting, logging, killing of wildlife. Extension officers support farmers on request.

Sustainable Development Impacts

The forum projects are geared to promote integrated sustainable agricultural practices that would ensure enhanced production which does not compromise environmental wellness, and that would lead to assured economic gains resulting in economic empowerment, food security, better housing and living conditions, access to social ammenities and improved infrustracture. The activities have incorporated awareness creation, trainings, demonstration sites, involvement of relevant stakeholders. Farmers have been trained, learned and practicing good agricultural practices, choice and handling of agro-chemicals, choice of draught resistant crops, , beekeeping as a biodiversity supportive yet economic gaining practice, construction of gabions to prevent soil erosion, not to hunt and kill wildlife. Farmers have learned the nutritious value of their traditional crops and resumed growing of crops that are rich in nutritional elements.

Scalability

NSSFF is a member of the larger national forum - the Smallholders Farmers Forum (SFA). SFA members learn from each other. Projects implemented by NSSFF are shared with others in similar climatic regions and vise versa. NSSFF also through SFA - which is a member of the Eastern and South African Small Scale Farmers Forum - learns or shares lessons learned with other farmers in Africa.The chair of NSSFF is the National Coordinator of SFA

Replicability

Other regions of Kenya could organise themselves in the same manner - by grouping small scale farmers into associations through which farmers can self manage and lobby for better gainful sustainable agriculture. Through SFA, NSSFF encourages other counties to self establish and self manage.

Share this solution:

 


 

Equator Blog

About Equator Initiative 

Contact Us

Follow Us:       

August 8, 2017

Nepal Placeholder
Nepal

Conducting Local Knowledge-Based Research activities

About the Implementing organization

Name: Tenasserim River & Indigenous Peoples’ Networks (TRIP NET)

Country: Myanmar

Year of establishment: 2014

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Indigenous group or organization, Ethnic minority group or association

Description

TRIP NET’s model of Local Knowledge-Based Research can be differentiated from regular academic research by the fact that it is non-experts from the local area who decide on the research questions, develop the research plans, implement the research and analyse the findings. TRIP NET facilitates this process with its partner communities by providing training on specific skills requested by the community, bringing-in knowledgeable advisors as requested, and assisting in the design and publishing of the community’s research findings into effective advocacy materials.
Through Local Knowledge-Based Research activities, villagers have become more confident that they possess knowledge which outsiders cannot possess. This is a key element of the local peoples’ bargaining power when dealing with outsiders (be they government officials, INGOs or businesspeople) and demanding a seat at the table regarding the future development of Tanintharyi Region.
In relation to Myanmar’s national-level natural resource management and land management laws and procedures, the TRIP NET model is quite innovative. It is fundamentally based on facilitating indigenous communities’ to document and implement their indigenous knowledge and practices for sustainable natural resource management. In this model, local people are the best placed to conduct research on and create knowledge about the local natural resources as they live in interdependence with them.

Nature Element

Forests / Wildlife / Mountains / Wetlands / Rivers

Type of Action

Protection / Restoration / Sustainable use / Access and benefit sharing / Advocacy for land / Awareness and education

Sustainable Development Element

Food security / Water security

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

  

Environmental Impacts

Depending on the focus of the research question, the environmental impacts of the Local Knowledge-Based Research activities range from conservation to sustainable resource management to water quality monitoring to flora and fauna inventories, etc. The Local Knowledge-Based Research activities are a fundamental step towards TRIP NET’s wider objectives of empowering local people to be confident in their environmental knowledge and ability to manage their own nature resources. The LKBR research process and findings ensure that community-protected conservation zones and protected areas are suitable and will be sustained in the future by active and motivated local peoples’ organizations.

Sustainable Development Impacts

TRIP NET’s Local Knowledge-Based Research activities contribute to the achievement of SDG 15 , particularly 15.1 and 15.9. TRIP NET impact: TRIP NET’s Local Knowledge-Based Research activities empower local people to be confident in their environmental knowledge and ability to manage their own nature resources. The research findings of TRIP NET’s partner communities have been used in advocacy for the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of watershed forests and rivers across Tanintharyi Region. The local Knowledge-Based Research activities also empower local people to set local conservation priorities and conduct research in support of their goals. While in the past it was common for government officials and International Conservation organizations to ignore local people by saying they did not have research to support their claims, when communities implement their own research they are able to demand a seat at the decision-making table.

Scalability

TRIP NET’s model of working with local people to develop Local Knowledge-Based Research activities can only be scaled-up to a certain extent because it is by definition a process that needs to happen at the local level. That being said, the Local Knowledge-Based Research model could be implemented by national level government agencies doing development interventions in any part of Myanmar. Specifically, research-based policy interventions should be grounded in priorities and analysis coming directly from the affected people.

Replicability

The Local Knowledge-Based Research model can be easily replicated in other parts of Tanintharyi Region and Myanmar. Having local people set conservation priorities, and develop and implement environmental research is a model that can be replicated at the village-level, and in many ways is a process that can grow organically through example. The model of Local Knowledge-Based Research has already been replicated among TRIP NET’s partner communities. For example, villagers in Tapo were inspired to conduct a fish inventory in the Tha Ra Bwin Stream after seeing the outcome of the fish inventory conducted in the Tenasserim River by the Kamoethway community.

Share this solution:

 


 

Equator Blog

About Equator Initiative 

Contact Us

Follow Us:       

August 8, 2017

Brazil Placeholder
Brazil

Carbon Funding for Widespread Adoption of Improved Cookstoves

About the Implementing organization

Name: Instituto Perene

Country: Brazil

Year of establishment: 2006

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Legally recognized non-profit status

Description

The solution is to enable thousands of rural households to substitute their old, smoky stoves with efficient cookstoves by subsidizing the cost with revenue from the sale of carbon credits. This is a pioneering initiative, and to date, the only cookstove project in Brazil to harness carbon financing. When Instituto Perene first identified the need for cleaner cooking technology, the team developed an appropriate stove design with the help of local builders and cooks. The result was a robust, built-in model equipped with a chimney and durability of 10 years. Villagers were enthusiastic about obtaining the new stove, but the price was out of reach for the local population, which is among Brazil´s poorest. The answer came in the form of a partnership with the Brazilian company Natura, which purchases carbon credits to offset its corporate emissions. The revenue from the sale of the credits is used for construction and monitoring. It is important to note recipients contribute approximately 20% of the stove cost, either in cash or in-kind (bricks and cement), which helps ensure their commitment to proper maintenance. Instituto Perene carried out all steps of the carbon offset project, from local stakeholder engagement to non-renewable biomass studies, quantification of emissions reductions and monitoring of social and environmental impacts. External auditing, project validation and carbon credit issuance is performed by the independent auditor The Gold Standard.

 

 

 

Nature Element

Forests / Coasts / Wetlands / Rivers / Wildlife

Type of Action

Sustainable use / Access and benefit sharing

Sustainable Development Element

Health / Renewable energy / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

    

Environmental Impacts

The Efficient Cookstoves program has a positive impact both on local air pollution and global climate change. To date, 157,800 tons of carbon credits have been contracted, of which 36,768 tCO2e have already been issued by The Gold Standard Foundation, an internationally-recognized certification body based in Switzerland. The stove substitution results in a reduction of fuelwood use of approx.14,000 tons/year. This directly reduces pressure on the surrounding forests and wildlife habitat, from which communities extract firewood. The Atlantic Forest has a high species diversity, many of which are endemic, but this tropical biome is severely threatened by overuse, with less than 9% of its original vegetation remaining - it is listed by Conservation International as one of the world's 25 Biodiversity Hotspots.

Sustainable Development Impacts

As Secretary-General-Designate of the United Nations António Guterres pointed out "Clean cooking impacts multiple Sustainable Development Goals and must play a central role in our work to ensure the realization of human needs and fundamental rights". Stove substitution is a direct climate action as it reduces greenhouse gas emissions and helps protect forest resources. The program has generated 36,768 tons CO2e of certified VERs (Voluntary Emissions Reductions) to date, with an additional 120,000 tCO2e under contract. The 7,000 stoves installed so far are benefitting 26,600 people across 491 communities. Health benefits are reported by 87% of cookstove users, with the main points being less respiratory discomfort and decreased redness and stinging in eyes. General cleanliness of the kitchen is also much improved, with walls, ceilings and cookware free of soot.

Scalability

Instituto Perene has steadily increased the scale of operation in Brazil. Perene began disseminating cookstoves in 2008, testing models in six rural homes. With a US$5000 grant from CARE Brazil, a consultant from Aprovecho Research Center was hired to help fine-tune the stove model and make it the most efficient possible. From this start-up phase, the carbon project was formatted and the first 1,000 stoves were built under contract beginning in 2009. Two more contracts and 6,000 more stoves have since been added. The work is on-going, with approximately 250 stoves/month being built. The stove model is very robust and built to last 10 years, providing a durable answer to the problem of rudimentary, inefficient open-fires. The demand for this efficient cookstove is enormous, with an estimated 50,000 families still to be served in the immediate region, and over 3 million households in Brazil alone.

Replicability

An estimated 3 billion people worldwide depend on biomass fuel for daily cooking and heating, according to the World Health Organization. To meet this need, a broad array of technical solutions and financing mechanisms will have to be employed. Instituto Perene believes that the framework it has developed to fund the dissemination of efficient stoves through carbon financing is a highly replicable solution. Instituto Perene is looking for partnerships to replicate this cookstove program experience, offering our expertise in carbon-financing and grassroots technology development, including establishing Community Agent networks, performing temporal analysis of satellite imagery to assess biomass resources, systematic identification and recording of stove installations, rigorous monitoring of impacts,and the step-by-step process for project registration, validation, verification and certification by an independent, third-party.

Share this solution:

 


 

Equator Blog

About Equator Initiative 

Contact Us

Follow Us:       

August 8, 2017

Nigeria Placeholder
Nigeria

Solar Panel Installation

About the Implementing organization

Name: Arimathea Foundation for Development

Country: Nigeria

Year of establishment: 2013

Type of organization: Legally recognized non-profit status

Description

The Foundation and Trainees set up 13 solar power systems in the community using 15 solar panels. Six were street lights installed at strategic locations including the market square and the Village Police station. six were domestic/commercial (Kiosk) premises installations. They trainees learnt to install and maintain solar power installations and were taught business skills to help generate income from the skills.

Panda development area (a sub county) of Karu Local Government area, with a population of about 200,000 people has no electricity from the national grid in any town or village and no known solar powered system, except for a carcass of government solar panels at the old development area secretariat that was never completed and a Bible translation office that had a solar system, not because of climate change issue, but for a need Power supply. All small businesses or houses with power use a Petrol or diesel Generators, culprits of climate change. This initiative was the first to create awareness on the Climate change problem and introduce solar power as a solution and integrating it with skills for poverty alleviation and youth empowerment, making it an all inclusive solution.

Nature Element

Forests / Grasslands

Type of Action

Protection / Pollution prevention, clean up

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Renewable energy / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

    

Environmental Impacts

The Solar power installations especially in houses and businesses that benefited have substituted their use of petrol and diesel generators, which has contributed to removing 1312.5 tones the major green house gas CO2 per annum (based on 50KW offsetting 25t/p.a.), thus contributing to reducing the global green house gasses burden.

Sustainable Development Impacts

 Solar power use protects against climate change and its effects such as flooding and desertification. Adoption of this solution in Panda Development area as a popular solution will make it one of the few areas in today's world were that can be an entirely solar powered area, and a model for clean energy solutions.

Scalability

There is huge potential for upscaling. Currently, Nigeria, wants to build six Solar power stations in the country, one in each of the six geopolitical zones. Some companies have been hired to try that model, about two years ago, which one source put at a cost of about forty million N40, 000,000= about $200,000= then. This clearly shows this solution can be upscaled at village and local authority level. There are already solar power farms around the world for organisations.

Replicability

The Solar power solution is easily replicable in many villages in the area and would not be only supplemental but desirable main source of power for any of all of the villages in the area that don't have community power.

Share this solution:

 


 

Equator Blog

About Equator Initiative 

Contact Us

Follow Us:       

August 8, 2017

Ecuador Placeholder
Ecuador

Recovery of the population of the Amazon River Turtles

About the Implementing organization

Name: Fundacion para la Sobrevivencia del Pueblo Cofan

Country: Ecuador

Year of establishment: 1999

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Legally recognized non-profit status, Indigenous group or organization

Description

This project was designed, implemented, and continues to be supported in the absence of outside funding by the Cofan indigenous community of Zabalo in concert with Zabalo's successful non-government organization, Fundacion para la Sobrevivencia Cofan. Over the past twenty five years of the program, Zabalo and FSC have been able to rebuild the Amazon River Turtle population to the point that limited harvesting and commercialization of eggs and meat is once again possible. Government recognition, while slow, has included licensing of the community to engage in controlled commercialization both within the country and on an international scale. The project represents a true grass-roots solution to a problem faced throughout Amazonia, and has not only affected the local turtle population but has also set the standard for exceptional community based management of other wildlife and plant resources within Zabalo's territories. While other, more typical, projects rely heavily on outside scientists, huge investments in infrastructure, and relatively small numbers of local people involved, this project is entirely run by the community, with everyone- men, women, children, senior citizens- everyone! involved....

Nature Element

Forests / Wetlands / Rivers / Wildlife

Type of Action

Protection / Restoration / Sustainable use / Access and benefit sharing / Awareness and education

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security / Health

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

    

Environmental Impacts

The Amazon River Turtles were major actors in the wetland and riverine ecosystems of northeast Ecuador during past centuries. Serving both as food and feeders, the ecological impact of thousands of turtles in the waterways was of major importance to the health of the environment. Destruction of the population during the mid and late 20th century affected not only the turtles themselves but the entire fluvial ecosystem. The return of these species has restored these habitats to a far more productive and healthy state. Meanwhile, human use of this resource- long part of the cultural and nutritional fabric of the Cofan- is once again an option. Most importantly for the environment, Zabalo's successful management of the turtles paved the way for widespread application of management strategies for all of Zabalo's wildlife and forest resources, resulting in arguably the best managed indigenous territory in Ecuador.

Sustainable Development Impacts

Zabalo's commitment to the Amazon River Turtles began in 1989, and continues to the present, in spite of multiple ups and downs in outside interest and funding. In the process, management skills were applied to not only the turtles, but to other significant wildlife and forest resources, resulting in a deep commitment to a sustainable use of available resources to maintain both cultural and nutritional integrity. If we are able to access adequate funding to effectively commercialize the baby turtles through "sales" to a receptive tourism for release in the wild, we will have created a secondary but tremendously important benefit for the community, as it not only manages wildlife for its own use but also for an active long term economic benefit. (See annex for detailed info on the "sale" of the baby turtles to local tourism.)

Scalability

This project is totally within the reach of other Amazonian indigenous communities. All that is lacking is the will. If we are successful in creating a "market" for the well-managed baby turtles, other communities will clamor to become involved. The basic techniques of management are simple. However, lack of a long term perspective increasingly afflicts indigenous communities as they come in contact with the very short term and exploitive goals of the Western culture, where there is little or no true understanding of concepts such as sustainability. Without a positive economic incentive, it is doubtful whether the turtle program, in spite of its simplicity, low cost, and cultural friendliness, will be expanded within a national context increasingly marked by short term goals. However, if Zabalo's attempts at commercialization are successful, expansion will be relatively simple and rapid during the next decade.

Replicability

Attempts by NGOs to replicate Zabalo's success in other regions and countries have met with limited acceptance; however, Cofan methodology for care of the eggs and neonates has been disseminated widely, and where it has been applied, has helped local turtle populations on an at least short term basis. Problems faced by NGOs include lack of necessary time and training, attempts to take a "top-down" approach with the local population, and failure to accept indigenous community control of the project. In the words of a young Kichwa from the Yasuni, where WWF was seeking to implement a similar program, "its their project, not ours". This highlights the tremendous difference between the Zabalo project and others. Can we reproduce the results in Amazon waterways on a wide scale basis? The answer is a resounding yes, but to do so, the project needs to be spread from indigenous culture to indigenous culture, and at least short term benefits need to be available.

Share this solution:

 


 

Equator Blog

About Equator Initiative 

Contact Us

Follow Us: