Cameroon Gender and Environment Watch

Key Facts

Equator Prize Winner: 2019
Year of establishment: 2007
Location: North West Region, Cameroon
Ecosystem: Forests, Mountains

Created in 2007, Cameron Gender and Environment Watch (CAMGEW) brings together women’s empowerment, community livelihoods, and ecology to address environmental challenges in northwestern Cameroon. Recognizing that local livelihoods are deeply integrated with the health of local ecosystems, the group has planted 75,000 bee-loving African cherry trees (Prunus Africana) in degraded areas of Kilum-Ijim Forest to serve as a carbon sink and protect key watersheds. At the same time, they have trained over 1,000 bee farmers in honey production for market, while a complementary programme has trained 772 farmers on agroforestry to bolster soil health and provide alternative firewood sources. To empower women farmers, CAMGEW offers both business training and microloans through a programme that has, to date, trained 1,580 women and provided 1,325 loans. In a time of ongoing conflict in Cameroon, the organization has made a powerful impact on the health of local ecosystems and the well-being of local communities.

Contact Information

Wirsiy Emmanuel Binyuy
Apiculture and Nature Conservation Campaigner
camgew@gmail.com
http://www.camgew.org

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Key Facts

Equator Prize Winner: 2019
Year of establishment: 2007
Location: North West Region, Cameroon
Ecosystem: Forests, Mountains

Created in 2007, Cameron Gender and Environment Watch (CAMGEW) brings together women’s empowerment, community livelihoods, and ecology to address environmental challenges in northwestern Cameroon. Recognizing that local livelihoods are deeply integrated with the health of local ecosystems, the group has planted 75,000 bee-loving African cherry trees (Prunus Africana) in degraded areas of Kilum-Ijim Forest to serve as a carbon sink and protect key watersheds. At the same time, they have trained over 1,000 bee farmers in honey production for market, while a complementary programme has trained 772 farmers on agroforestry to bolster soil health and provide alternative firewood sources. To empower women farmers, CAMGEW offers both business training and microloans through a programme that has, to date, trained 1,580 women and provided 1,325 loans. In a time of ongoing conflict in Cameroon, the organization has made a powerful impact on the health of local ecosystems and the well-being of local communities.

Contact Information

Wirsiy Emmanuel Binyuy
Apiculture and Nature Conservation Campaigner
http://www.camgew.org