Hui Maka‘āinana o Makana

Key Facts

Equator Prize Winner: 2019
Year of establishment: 1999
Location: Hanalei, Hawaii, United States
Ecosystem: Oceans and coasts

On the north shore of the island of Kaua’i, Hui Makaʻāinana o Makana takes a place-centered approach that weaves together the identity and culture of native Hawaiian communities to sustainably manage their nearshore fisheries. Through sustained work at the grassroots and policy levels over the past 25 years, the group successfully attained a groundbreaking agreement with the Hawaiian Government in 2015 to establish a Community-based Subsistence Fishing Area, setting a key precedent for Hawaii and the Pacific. The fishing area is managed used traditional ecological knowledge, including the designation of a pu’uhonua or sanctuary area. The group’s sustainable marine management is complemented by a mosaic of other initiatives supporting the conservation and sustainable use of agricultural areas, sacred sites, and the entire watershed in the face of climate change.

Contact Information

Emily Cadiz
Program Coordinator
huimakaainaomakana99@gmail.com
http://www.huimakaainanaomakana.org

Case study

 
Download English
 

Related resources

 

Equator Prize 2019

 

Marine and Coastal Resource Management

Share this page:

Equator Prize 2019

 

Global North

Marine and Coastal Resource Management

Equator Prize 2019

 

Global North

Marine and Coastal Resource Management

Share this page:

Key Facts

Equator Prize Winner: 2019
Year of establishment: 1999
Location: Hanalei, Hawaii, United States
Ecosystem: Oceans and coasts

On the north shore of the island of Kaua’i, Hui Makaʻāinana o Makana takes a place-centered approach that weaves together the identity and culture of native Hawaiian communities to sustainably manage their nearshore fisheries. Through sustained work at the grassroots and policy levels over the past 25 years, the group successfully attained a groundbreaking agreement with the Hawaiian Government in 2015 to establish a Community-based Subsistence Fishing Area, setting a key precedent for Hawaii and the Pacific. The fishing area is managed used traditional ecological knowledge, including the designation of a pu’uhonua or sanctuary area. The group’s sustainable marine management is complemented by a mosaic of other initiatives supporting the conservation and sustainable use of agricultural areas, sacred sites, and the entire watershed in the face of climate change.

Contact Information

Emily Cadiz
Program Coordinator
http://www.huimakaainanaomakana.org