Vondron’Olona Ifotony Tatamo Miray an’Andranobe

Key Facts

Equator Prize Winner: 2020
Year of establishment: 2004
Location: Vakinankaratra, Madagascar
Ecosystem: Forests and mountains

In 2004, facing the deterioration of the 90-hectare Andranobe Lake which provided the base of their local fishing and agriculture livelihoods, four communities in central Madagascar came together to form the community-based organization Tatamo Miray an’Andranobe (TAMIA). Based on customary social contracts, TAMIA has served as a platform to restore the lake’s water level and quality, remove invasive aquatic species, and repopulate fish stocks. Planting trees on the adjacent hillsides, the communities reduced silting of the lake by 50%. Fish catches increased from 8 tonnes in 2004 to 20 tonnes in 2019. 420 hectares of farms are under irrigation with lake water even in the dry season. The lake secures access to drinking water for 3,500 people. A water user association as well as farming and fishing cooperatives under the umbrella of TAMIA have further contributed to higher and more predictable incomes for villagers.

Contact Information

Henri Rakotoson
President
henrirakotoson794@gmail.com

Case study

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Related resources

 

Equator Prize 2020

 

Sub-Saharan Africa

Ecoagriculture and Food Security
Freshwater Management

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Equator Prize 2020

 

Sub-Saharan Africa

Ecoagriculture and Food Security
Freshwater Management

Equator Prize 2020

 

Sub-Saharan Africa

Ecoagriculture and Food Security
Freshwater Management

Share this page:

Key Facts

Equator Prize Winner: 2020
Year of establishment: 2004
Location: Vakinankaratra, Madagascar
Ecosystem: Forests and mountains

In 2004, facing the deterioration of the 90-hectare Andranobe Lake which provided the base of their local fishing and agriculture livelihoods, four communities in central Madagascar came together to form the community-based organization Tatamo Miray an’Andranobe (TAMIA). Based on customary social contracts, TAMIA has served as a platform to restore the lake’s water level and quality, remove invasive aquatic species, and repopulate fish stocks. Planting trees on the adjacent hillsides, the communities reduced silting of the lake by 50%. Fish catches increased from 8 tonnes in 2004 to 20 tonnes in 2019. 420 hectares of farms are under irrigation with lake water even in the dry season. The lake secures access to drinking water for 3,500 people. A water user association as well as farming and fishing cooperatives under the umbrella of TAMIA have further contributed to higher and more predictable incomes for villagers.

Contact Information

Henri Rakotoson
President