BIO-KG Federation of Organic Development

Key Facts

Equator Prize Winner: 2021
Year of establishment: 2012
Location: 43/1 Grazhdanskaya street, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Ecosystem: Agricultural, Mountains

Spearheading the concept of the “Organic Aimak” (community or district), BIO-KG has promoted the transition of agriculture in rural and mountain communities to organic-only production in a landscape-level approach. Revitalizing the connection with Mother Earth in the face of depleted soils, this community organization has inspired bottom-up processes leading to village decisions to form “organic districts” based on the removal of chemical fertilizers, use of traditional knowledge and practices, farmer-to-farmer field schools, and saving of seed varieties suitable for variable climatic conditions. Over 1,000 farmers have been certified as growers of organic produce. Ten organic aimaks have been created, six of which are led by women. The model has taken root in Kyrgyzstan, and BIO-KG played an instrumental role in the government’s commitment to transition to organic agriculture nationwide within a decade.

Contact Information

Asan Alymkulov
Program Coordinator
alymkulov.asan@gmail.com
http://www.biokg.org

Case study

 
Download English
 

Related resources

 

Equator Prize 2021

 

Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Ecoagriculture and Food Security

Share this page:

Equator Prize 2021

 

Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Ecoagriculture and Food Security

Equator Prize 2021

 

Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Ecoagriculture and Food Security

Share this page:

Key Facts

Equator Prize Winner: 2021
Year of establishment: 2012
Location: 43/1 Grazhdanskaya street, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Ecosystem: Agricultural, Mountains

Spearheading the concept of the “Organic Aimak” (community or district), BIO-KG has promoted the transition of agriculture in rural and mountain communities to organic-only production in a landscape-level approach. Revitalizing the connection with Mother Earth in the face of depleted soils, this community organization has inspired bottom-up processes leading to village decisions to form “organic districts” based on the removal of chemical fertilizers, use of traditional knowledge and practices, farmer-to-farmer field schools, and saving of seed varieties suitable for variable climatic conditions. Over 1,000 farmers have been certified as growers of organic produce. Ten organic aimaks have been created, six of which are led by women. The model has taken root in Kyrgyzstan, and BIO-KG played an instrumental role in the government’s commitment to transition to organic agriculture nationwide within a decade.

Contact Information

Asan Alymkulov
Program Coordinator
http://www.biokg.org