Author: Qinyu Li

August 8, 2017

Jamaica Placeholder
Jamaica

IMPROVED CONSERVATION IN THE ORACABESSA BAY FISH SANCTUARY, JAMAICA

About the Implementing organization

Name: Oracabessa Foundation

Country: Jamaica

Year of establishment: 1997

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Legally recognized non-profit status, Community enterprise or business

Description

The goal of the two-phase project was to preserve the marine ecosystem in the Oracabessa Bay Fish Sanctuary and to increase biodiversity and species population, including that of turtles and coral populations. In the short term, the sanctuary sought to create a no-fishing zone protecting the Bay’s critical breeding areas and fish habitat. In the long-term, the project sought to reverse the decline of biodiversity in the Oracabessa Bay. To fulfill this aim, the project set the following objectives including (1) increasing the number of sea turtles and healthy coral, (2) improve surveillance and monitoring of fish, turtle, and coral populations within the sanctuary; (3) strengthening community capacity to manage its marine resources; and (4) improving livelihoods through increased local benefits from marine resources. Community outreach and capacity building activities provided the foundation for the project. Three workshops were conducted - 24 participants learned fisheries management, coral and turtle conservation, marine composting, and the importance of national and international policies for sustainable fish stock. The training was provided by various partners including the St. Mary’s Fisherman’s, Seascape Caribbean - scientific and technical expertise in coral reforestation, trained the certified PADI Scuba divers in coral gardening techniques and the University of the West Indies (UWI) provided training in fisheries management and assessments on the estuarine area.

Nature Element

Oceans

Type of Action

Protection / Restoration / Sustainable use / Pollution prevention / clean up / Awareness and education

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

    

Environmental Impacts

The initiative contributed favorably to the maintenance and conservation of various ecosystems including four reef systems, two sea grass areas, two mangrove areas, one turtle nesting beach, one estuarine area and one breeding lagoon. This initiative resulted in: increased coral production by expanding three coral garden nurseries with 4,000 pieces with a further 8000 pieces to be planted. Two local spear-fishermen trained and certified as coral gardeners.

By 2013, coral cover increased by 153% up from 91%, fish density by 272%, fish size by 16%, fish biomass by 564% and algae reduced by 43% since 2011. With the purchase of a patrol boat, the group now has better surveillance and monitoring capacity of the protected area. Seven “No fishing” signs and buoys clearly demarcate the sanctuary.

The Hawksbill turtle population has recovered where nesting has increased from 14,000 hatchlings to over 22,000 in 2015.

Sustainable Development Impacts

The sustainability and success of the OBFS is built on the community members’ opportunity to support their livelihoods through the sanctuary. Approximately 35 people have been able to directly improve their livelihoods through the project.
The nutrient-rich debris collected from the beaches is repurposed as potting compost and soil for local markets, creating a new revenue stream, especially for the two turtle nesting area composters that have been employed by OBFS. Three coral gardeners were employed and also earn additional income by providing tour services around the coral gardens. Sea turtle nesting has resulted in a source of income for the OBFS foundation as guests from the Golden Eye Resort pay a small fee to view sea turtle nesting and release. In addition, eleven community members are being employed by OBFS, of whom six run a household with 4 or more dependents.

Scalability

While the group has seen tremendous results and made a tangible environmental and economic impact in Oracabessa Bay, its most important contribution may come beyond its boundaries at the policy and national levels. Prior to the group's success, it remained an open question whether or not community-based marine protection could work at all in Jamaica. The sanctuaries that were established were little more than “paper parks” than anything. Oracabessa has changed that. Now, fishers along the North Coast are asking that Sanctuaries be established in their areas. The Ministry under which Agriculture and Fisheries fall, made the announcement (while on a site visit to Oracabessa Bay) that they are working to establish four more sanctuaries in Jamaica based largely on the results they have seen.

Showing that community-based marine resource management can work in Jamaica may be the most important legacy of the Oracabessa Bay Fish Sanctuary.

Replicability

This initiative is now one of the priorities for the Jamaican Government, already, the group is working closely with donors (including the GEF SGP) to replicate across other sanctuaries. Following a Memorandum of Agreement between the Oracabessa Foundation & Fisheries, OBFS was one of the nine sanctuaries established on May 17, 2010. Consequently, OBFS has been granted power under the Natural Resources Conservation Authority Establishment of Authority (NRCA) to protect fish populations that live and breed within the parameters of the sanctuary. Based on its outstanding work, the Oracabessa group was invited to a stakeholder consultation on Jamaica’s National Biodiversity Strategic Action Plans.

With financial support from other donors, the group is now supporting other sanctuary sites to empower fishers, create partnerships and establish other fish sanctuaries.

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August 8, 2017

India Placeholder
India

Reef for Fish for Ever programme

About the Implementing organization

Name: C - Pudupet Traditional Fishing Community,

Country: India

Year of establishment: 1998

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Indigenous group or organization

Description

Reefs for fish are manmade structures deployed at the sea bottom to increase the surface area available for marine organisms. The Reefs for fish to enhance the marine fishery resources for the livelihood of the fishing community. This initiative also enriched the coastal biodiversity which has brought positive social and economic impacts with related to the following sustainable development goals. Reefs for fish are manmade structures deployed at the sea bottom to increase the surface area available for marine organisms. The Reefs for fish to enhance the marine fishery resources for the livelihood of the fishing community. This initiative also enriched the coastal biodiversity which has brought positive social and economic impacts with related to the following sustainable development goals.
Sustainable Development Goal 14 Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development• The fish production has increased per site of   reef @ 50 ton/year over and above the fish production from the non  reef area by usual fishing contribution to the national food security.• Introduction of Reefs for fish structures has increased the income of the fisher family and this improved income has helped the family to provide good education and better living leading to the well being of the community.
Sustainable Development Goal 4 Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all
Sustainable Development Goal 1 End poverty in all its forms everywhere
This innovation is people-friendly proven technology to enhance the marine fishery resources for the sustainable livelihood of the fishing community and also address the national food security issues. It will also conserve the coastal biodiversity and conserve the various endanger species in the reef zone. Fishers get sustainable income.

Nature Element

Oceans / Coasts / Wildlife

Type of Action

Protection / Restoration / Sustainable use / Access and benefit sharing / Pollution prevention / clean up

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

         

Environmental Impacts

1) 10000 sq m area serve as buffer zone where immigration and emigration of different varieties of fishes takes place, some become resident population start breeding which lead to the increase in the population size of various fish species in the reef area and increases the biomass production2) An estimated 1,90,000 USD worth of biodiversity product/ecosystem service produce per annum3) Planting of One reef structure can sequester in the sea between 3.66 to 10 kg of carbon dioxide every year4) Plant and nurture of 200 l reefs reduced annual CO2 emissions by 732 to 2000 kg every year 5) Considerable savings in fossil fuel and fishing time due to the proximity of the fishing ground in the artificial reef area 6) 5 L of fossil fuel saved per boat per day as they limit the travel to and fro the fishing ground which is below 5km distance from the fishing village and the fishers need not hunt for fish 7) o trhe reduction the CO2 per boat per day is estimated approximately to be 13.25kg

Sustainable Development Impacts

• 600 marginalized Fishermen, Dalit and  tribel families who lived Below Poverty Line (BPL) were helped to improve their income  and have attained economic status  Above Poverty Line (APL) within a period of three years. • 600 marginalized Fishermen, Dalit and  tribel families who lived Below Poverty Line (BPL) were helped to improve their income  and have attained economic status  Above Poverty Line (APL) within a period of three years. • 600 Fisher and tribal women and 200 tribal children nutrition status has been improved by increasing their intake of food from one time a day to three times a day consumption.  It was confirmed through a well-being biometric assessment study by measuring the individual weight, high and health screening.  • The infant mortality and morbidity has been reduced by 90% by appropriate health care interventions through coordination by the Community Based Organization and peoples federation with the government and other Non Government organizations.
• All the children of fishermen, Dalit and tribe going to school regularly which has reduced 90 percent child labour activities and reduced the school dropouts.
This innovation reduces ooverty land improves quality of living

 

Scalability

The innovation of deployment of Reef for fish structures has demonstrated cost effective fishery resource enhancement for sustainable fishing and conserve coastal biodiversity as an impact for the widespread adoption for the livelihood development of the marginalized fishermen community and also address the national food security issue.

UNDP GEF SGP CEE project has supported PLANT to implement one Reef Fabrication and Deployment project at Cuddalore district in Tamilnadu and later will be scaled up and replicate the innovation in other coastal states in India.

As an outcome of this project, the Hon’ble Australian consulate in Chennai recognized PLANT as their partner agency to implement a similar kind of live rock project in Tamilnadu. They have sanctioned the worth of Indian Ruppees 2,400,000 project.

In the mean time Hon’ble Australian Consulate in Chennai request PLANT to participate in the Blue Economy Aquaculture challenges project in the coming years as a long term project.

 

 

Replicability

Reef for Fish for Ever” project is being replicated in Ten villages “ at Kalpakkam in Kancheepuram district with the support of MAPS Corporate Social Responsibility fund. Reef for Fish for Ever” project is being replicated in Ten villages “ at Kalpakkam in Kancheepuram district with the support of MAPS Corporate Social Responsibility fund.
• Replication taken place in other maritime state coastal area also, as in the case of Gujarat has sanctioned Rs. 36 million ($ 57,16,285) for the deployment of  reefs in 14 sites along the Kutch District coast.
• The fishing community actively participated in the process of analyzing and re-framing the policy in the context of fishery sector organized by the UNDP FAO Fishery Management for Sustainable Livelihood project.  It was  recommended to frame new marine fisheries policies and inclusion of Reef for Fish for Ever project for the sustainable livelihood of the fishermen in India.
The fishing community along with the NGO is already doing the scaling up reef project to replicate in other coastal villages in India to address the national food security issues.

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August 7, 2017

Nepal Placeholder
Nepal

Smokeless Stove

About the Implementing organization

Name: Public Welfare Society Nepal (PWSN) (Jana Sewa Samaj Nepal in Nepali)

Country: Nepal

Year of establishment: 1991

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Legally recognized non-profit status, Community enterprise or business , Cooperative business, Women’s association or organization, Indigenous group or organization, Ethnic minority group or association

Description

70 percent Nepali household use firewood traditional cooking stove.
Smokeless stove is innovative and different from the traditional stove because it is easy to construct. One can build it by three hours practical training.We can use all local materials to construct it such mud and stone which are easily available in all over Nepal.

This stove pull out the smokes produced while cooking. It saves people who have to suffer from diseases caused by smoke. Less disease is less expenses in health. Mostly women, who cook food in Nepalese community. Therefor it saves money too.

It is convenient to use. We can cook food in two pots in one time. It is like a gas stove. The fire and smoke could not go out of stove, so the pot do not get black. One who use this stove do not have to spend more time to clean the pot. Thus It saves time too. People can invest their saving in other business.
Smokeless stove consume fifty percent less firewood. It saves firewood means it saves forest. Not only this, but also saves time of collecting firewood of the people.

Nature Element

Forests

Type of Action

Protection / Sustainable use / Pollution prevention / clean up / Awareness and education

Sustainable Development Element

Disaster risk reduction / Health / Renewable energy / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

      

Environmental Impacts

Smokeless stoves consume 50 percent less firewood. Its direct impact can be seen in the forest. The vegetation in jungle has drastically increase in our community after we started this campaign. Our campaign was 'one house one smokeless stove'.There are more than thousand smokeless constructed in the initial one year.

A household consume about 3000 kgs of firewood per year. One mature tree can give 1000 kgs of firewood. One household saves one and half trees per year. We would say that we saved 1500 trees per year by this action. Thus smokeless stove directly contributes to environmental conversation.

Sustainable Development Impacts

Smokeless stove is easy to build using local materials. It requires a one time assembling. Maintenance is also easy because of using local materials. So, this stove itself is sustainable.

It saves time, health, money of people. They can use their surplus time to other income generation activities. This makes them to earn extra income. Therefore, smokeless stove contributes indirectly for whole community development.

The most important impact of this stove is environmental conversation. It saves forest, saving forest is saving from disaster such as landslide and saving wildlife as well. Consequently smokeless stove contribute to the sustainable development.

Scalability

In Nepal, 70 percent households use traditional firewood stove for cooking. It means about 3.8 million household use traditional stove. If these household use smokeless stove, we can save almost 5.5 million tress per year.

People don't know about this stove. We can conduct awareness campaigns about the importance of Smokeless stove. When people know that it saves time, health, money and environment, they certainly ask how to build it. We can use media like FM radios,local news papers and TVs for awareness. Moreover, we con demonstrate in schools and village centers to make known them. We can train social leaders, teachers, students. Most importantly, we need to convince to the political leaders so that we can influence government policies.Thus, it could be expanded all over Nepal.

Replicability

Smokeless stove is easy to replicate. It is necessary to use by all the households who are using the traditional firewood stove to preserve our forest.
It doesn't need technical persons. A literate person can easily build this when trained. The main thing is using of local materials to construct it which is available all over Nepal.
Nepal is going in restructuring process. The new structure will be more efficient local bodies. The local bodies will have more rights to govern itself. We can conduct orientation about this stove to the local leaders. Once they convinced, they could include this campaign in their annual plan and budget. Thus we can replicate it all over Nepal.

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August 7, 2017

Nepal Placeholder
Nepal

Enhanced livelihood of marginalized community through cultivation of Cash Crop in Reclaimed Land

About the Implementing organization

Name: Human and National Development Society (HANDS)

Country: Nepal

Year of establishment: 2000

Type of organization: Non Government Organization

Description

The project has been enhancing the livelihood of poor and marginalized community by encouraging them towards cultivation of cash crops like sweet potato, taro, ginger, banana, water melon and turmeric in 327.5 ha of reclaimed land. It is estimated that the project has saved more than 2228 ha of land through cost effective environmental friendly bio-engineering schemes benefiting 4012 families. Two private multi-purpose nurseries with 30000 seedlings has come under operation. These agro- forestry initiatives have assisted in controlling the land erosion and improving the greenery along the river bank. To boost the income of 1245 families, agro-forestry program in 643 ha private and public land is ongoing, owing to the availability of fodder and grass. Vegetable farming has become one of the most attractive schemes for generating alternative income in the project community. Apart from this, fishery, piggery and poultry farming programs in coordination with Heifer Nepal have empowered women’s group socially and economically. Intensive training to 35 apiculture farmers was also imparted under this project which linked apiculture farmers with ‘Youth Self-Employment Program’ for further support. Other income generating activities included production of women made handloom and exporting it to Japan. Each of the participating women in this scheme have earned USD 110 to 130 per month.

Nature Element

Forests / Rivers / Grasslands / Drylands

Type of Action

Protection / Restoration / Sustainable use / Access and benefit sharing / Awareness and education / Advocacy for land & water rights

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security / Water security / Disaster risk reduction / Renewable energy / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

          

Environmental Impacts

As the project revolves around forest ecosystem and riverbank conservation, several activities were launched to enhance the land quality and protect forest. Stewardship of local students and shepherd was enhanced through eco-club formation for sustainable management. Students spoke about the role of local people in NTFPs conservation, river bank protection and bioengineering work which was aired from local FM station. Shepherds were educated separately on sustainable forest products utilization through an efficient story telling approach. In order to convince the local people, two demo plots were established. NTFPs farming support by the initiative has improved lessened human wildlife conflict. In order to save the forest resources, improved cooking stoves were installed which reduced the 60% less fuelwood compared to pre-project scenario. The project collectively helped environmental conservation through riverbank protection and sustainable natural resource management.

Sustainable Development Impacts

The project has facilitated formation of CBOs like agro-forestry groups, animal husbandry groups, bio-engineering users group and cooperatives. All these CBOs have been providing institutional support ranging from training/orientation to stationery support like saving and credit ledger book. The project has strengthened Pushpanjali cooperatives providing the necessary input. HANDS Sindhuli has been gathered USD 32360 as co-funding from different agencies viz. Heifer Nepal (USD 12900), Poverty Alleviation Fund (USD 7540), Village Development Committee (USD 41200), District Agriculture Development Office (USD 35000) and District Livestock Service Office (USD 4300) for agro-forestry promotion, bio-engineering, seed support program and livelihood promotion. This co-funding is advantageous for fostering programmatic synergy and sustainability of project’s initiatives. With involvement of government line agencies, project initiated initiatives will continue from government’s fiscal budget.

Scalability

Bio-engineering scheme has been strengthened by “People’s River Protection Scheme’ of Department of Water Induced Disaster Prevention program. Local people are planning to mobilize local resources and continue the work, covering a longer stretch of the bank this year. To accomplish this task, Dudhauli municipal authorities have provided USD 2470 for the installation of 378 improved cooking stoves (ICSs). As ICSs produce negligible amount of smoke, the indoor air quality has improved and potential health hazard especially for housewives and children has averted. Meanwhile, in coordination with DDC Sindhuli and newly established Dudhauli Municipality, 210 Solar Home System have been installed in Mushahari tole of Ward 6 and 7 (40 Wp), which reduced 389.4 metric ton of CO2 annually. With the financial support of DDC Sindhuli, Dudhauli Municipality and technical assistance of Nilkamal Biogas Company, the installation of 26 biogas plants (each of 6 cubic meter) have materialized.

Replicability

As the project approach and strategy was low cost, community driven and local resource based, project’s generated many good practices are already replicated in different part of the country. The riverbank protection work along the Kamala river is replicated by Department of Water Induced Disaster Prevention in upstream of Kamala River and other similar river system in Nepal. Conservation of productive lands of marginalized Danuwar communities through making bamboo bhakari (bio-engineering practices) is widely replicated in the Kamala river basin as this technology safeguard the productive land along the riverbank. The plantation of fast growing trees and improved varieties of grass is being up-scaled by the neighboring communities of Sindhuli. The animal husbandry with improved shed is replicated by Heifer International in different districts of Nepal. The cultivation of climate resilient cash crops is up-scaled in Siraha and Dhanusha districts of Nepal.

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August 7, 2017

Nepal Placeholder
Nepal

Enhancing Livelihood of poor and marginalized community with cultivation of Cash Crop in reclaimed land

About the Implementing organization

Name: Human and National Development Society (HANDS)

Country: Nepal

Year of establishment: 2008

Type of organization: Non Government Organization

Description

The project has been enhancing the livelihood of poor and marginalized community by encouraging them towards cultivation of cash crops like sweet potato, taro, ginger, banana, water melon and turmeric in 327.5 ha of reclaimed land. It is estimated that the project has saved more than 2228 ha of land through cost effective environmental friendly bio-engineering schemes benefiting 4012 families. Two private multi-purpose nurseries with 30000 seedlings has come under operation. These agro- forestry initiatives have assisted in controlling the land erosion and improving the greenery along the river bank. To boost the income of 1245 families, agro-forestry program in 643 ha private and public land is ongoing, owing to the availability of fodder and grass. Vegetable farming has become one of the most attractive schemes for generating alternative income in the project community. Apart from this, fishery, piggery and poultry farming programs in coordination with Heifer Nepal have empowered women’s group socially and economically. Intensive training to 35 apiculture farmers was also imparted under this project which linked apiculture farmers with ‘Youth Self-Employment Program’ for further support. Other income generating activities included production of women made handloom and exporting it to Japan. Each of the participating women in this scheme have earned USD 110 to 130 per month.

Nature Element

Forests / Rivers / Grasslands / Drylands

Type of Action

Protection / Restoration / Sustainable use / Access and benefit sharing / Awareness and education / Advocacy for land & water rights

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security / Water security / Disaster risk reduction / Renewable energy / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

          

Environmental Impacts

As the project revolves around forest ecosystem and riverbank conservation, several activities were launched to enhance the land quality and protect forest. Stewardship of local students and shepherd was enhanced through eco-club formation for sustainable management. Students spoke about the role of local people in NTFPs conservation, river bank protection and bioengineering work which was aired from local FM station. Shepherds were educated separately on sustainable forest products utilization through an efficient story telling approach. In order to convince the local people, two demo plots were established. NTFPs farming support by the initiative has improved lessened human wildlife conflict. In order to save the forest resources, improved cooking stoves were installed which reduced the 60% less fuelwood compared to pre-project scenario. The project collectively helped environmental conservation through riverbank protection and sustainable natural resource management.

Sustainable Development Impacts

The project has facilitated formation of CBOs like agro-forestry groups, animal husbandry groups, bioengineering users group and cooperatives. All these CBOs have been providing institutional support ranging from training/orientation to stationery support like saving and credit ledger book. The project has strengthened Pushpanjali cooperatives providing necessary input. HANDS Sindhuli has been gathered USD 32360 as co-funding from different agencies viz. Heifer Nepal (USD 12900), Poverty Alleviation Fund (USD 7540), Village Development Committee (USD 41200), District Agriculture Development Office (USD 35000) and District Livestock Service Office (USD 4300) for agro-forestry promotion, bio-engineering, seed support program and livelihood promotion. This co-funding is advantageous for fostering programmatic synergy and sustainability of the project’s initiatives. With involvement of government line agencies, project initiated initiatives will continue from government’s fiscal budget.

Scalability

Bio-engineering scheme has been strengthened by “People’s River Protection Scheme’ of Department of Water Induced Disaster Prevention program. Local people are planning to mobilize local resources and continue the work, covering a longer stretch of the bank this year. To accomplish this task, Dudhauli municipal authorities have provided USD 2470 for the installation of 378 improved cooking stoves (ICSs). As ICSs produce negligible amount of smoke, the indoor air quality has improved and potential health hazard especially for housewives and children has averted. Meanwhile, in coordination with DDC Sindhuli and newly established Dudhauli Municipality, 210 Solar Home System have been installed in Mushahari tole of Ward 6 and 7 (40 Wp), which reduced 389.4 metric ton of CO2 annually. With the financial support of DDC Sindhuli, Dudhauli Municipality and technical assistance of Nilkamal Biogas Company, the installation of 26 biogas plants (each of 6 cubic meter) have materialized.

Replicability

As the project approach and strategy was low cost, community driven and local resource based, project’s generated many good practices are already replicated in different part of the country. The riverbank protection work along the Kamala river is replicated by Department of Water Induced Disaster Prevention in upstream of Kamala River and other similar river system in Nepal. Conservation of productive lands of marginalized Danuwar communities through making bamboo bhakari (bio-engineering practices) is widely replicated in the Kamala river basin as this technology safeguard the productive land along the riverbank. The plantation of fast growing trees and improved varieties of grass is being up-scaled by the neighboring communities of Sindhuli. The animal husbandry with improved shed is replicated by Heifer International in different districts of Nepal. The cultivation of climate resilient cash crops is up-scaled in Siraha and Dhanusha districts of Nepal.

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August 7, 2017

Tanzania, United Republic of Placeholder
Tanzania, United Republic of

Community camera-trapping

About the Implementing organization

Name: Ruaha Carnivore Project

Country: Tanzania, United Republic of

Year of establishment: 2009

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization

Description

Many conservation projects provide benefits to local communities, but few make the explicit link between wildlife protection and the magnitude of benefits. Also, there is often inequity in that the remote communities who live with the most dangerous wildlife and suffer most costs receive the least benefits from conservation. The Ruaha Carnivore Project developed an innovative model - thought to be the first of its kind in Africa - to ensure that there was a transparent, clear link between wildlife conservation on village land and community benefits, and that villagers with more wildlife received more benefits. Local villagers are trained in the use of camera-traps (cameras which automatically photograph an animal as it passes) and employed to set them out and monitor them on village land. Villagers receive points for each wild animal they photograph, with more points for the more potentially dangerous species. These points are swapped for educational, healthcare and veterinary benefits for the community - this engages people in wildlife conservation and incentivises them to maintain wildlife on village land. So far, 12 villages (comprising around 20,000 people) are engaged in the programme, and it has proved an extremely valuable way of providing employment, building capacity, reducing poverty and engaging poeple in conservation. The project is providing information about and training in this model so it can be replicated elsewhere in Tanzania, Africa and beyond.

Nature Element

Wildlife

Type of Action

Protection / Access and benefit sharing / Awareness and education

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Health

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

  

Environmental Impacts

The initiative is now working across 12 villages, employing 24 people and affecting around 20,000 villagers, and we have seen marked changes in terms of people recognising that the wildlife on their land is now generating valuable benefits for them. We have seen substantially reduced wildlife killing, particularly in terms of poisoning events, which are always extremely damaging for many species, including critically endangered vultures. Villagers have now recorded breeding prides of lions on village land, and instead of killing them have protected them and placed camera-traps in the area to generate more benefits. Sharing the images with the wider community has also improved knowledge of, and interest in, local wildlife and the villages are more engaged in conservation. They are taking their own decisions in terms of how to maximise benefits, such as protecting areas of habitat or reducing poisoning, so it has had marked positive impacts.

Sustainable Development Impacts

The community camera-trapping programme has now generated over US$160,000 of benefits for local villagers, and the project has been recognised by the regional government as the main provider of development assistance in the area. The benefits have been split equally between healthcare, education and veterinary medicine, so have improved livelihoods through better healthcare, improved educational opportunities for primary and secondary-school students, and have reduced livestock deaths due to disease, which has improved the economic security of pastoralist households. The project has trained and employed 24 people, improving their skills and livelihoods,and proving that conservation can generate valuable jobs within the village environment. Overall, the programme has has very substantial positive impacts in terms of improved health, job creation and improved livelihoods for all members of the community, with a clear link to wildlife conservation.

Scalability

The initiative was established less than 2 years ago, but there is already interest from the national government in how this kind of approach could be scaled up to other similar locations in Tanzania. Any expansion will require commensurate donor funding, but it is a very scalable approach to ensure that people receive tangible and equitable benefits from conserving wildilife on village land.

Replicability

The project is a founding member of the Pride Lion Conservation Alliance, which was established to help lion conservation projects share initiatives across a wider scale. Later this year, we will be training Mozambican conservationists from the Alliance, with a view of replicating the action in Mozambique's Niassa reserve. There is also interest in replicating it around Rungwa Game Reserve in Tanzania, and the model has also been shared with colleagues in Vietnam who are interested in replicating it there.

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August 7, 2017

Nepal Placeholder
Nepal

Community seed bank establishment

About the Implementing organization

Name: Shree Bhawani Community Seed Bank

Country: Nepal

Year of establishment: 2000

Type of organization: Cooperative business

Description

Most of the subsistence-oriented farmers save their own seeds for staple crops.Seed saving after every harvest is a common practice in Nepal, ensuring availability of quality seeds for next crop growing season.The main source of seeds were farmers’ own saved seeds (68 to 91%) & seed from neighbors and relatives.Most farmers followed seed selection before and after crop harvest.With this aged old practices,farmers are maintaining and conserving certain agro-biodiversity in their farms.In this regards,every farmer is conserving and utilizing specific crop varieties having utility values. Farmers need varieties of seeds to fulfill their diverse choices. But few crop varieties grown in farmers’ fields are not sufficient for it.Though, diversity provides flexibility of choices, unavailability of options to increase the value of landraces by maximizing benefits;lack of sufficient quality seeds, market inaccessibility & unfavorable policies made lost of landraces from farmers’ fields.Thus, local seed security is highly reduced & farmers have to depend on external sources for seeds & planting materials each year.In this context, CSB is providing diverse options to farmers satisfying their needs that enhanced the accessibility of rare, endangered and threatened germplasm & increased production of improved seeds.It also ensures conservation of traditional seeds in addition to commercialized improved crop seeds & conserve at least one traditional seeds by rules developed by community.

 

Nature Element

Forests / Mountains

Type of Action

Protection / Sustainable use / Access and benefit sharing / Awareness and education

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security / Health / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

      

Environmental Impacts

Purposes of such community seed banks are not only saving and exchanging local seeds and keeping them under the control of the farming community for easy access and use for seed security at the community level but also consolidating community roles in promoting conservation, sustainable use and improvement of important local genetic resources /
traditional knowledge. The initiative aim to promote the management and sustainable use of both local and farmer-preferred modern varieties for food security and to improve the livelihoods of farmers. This has helped in conserving environment with reducing chemical fertilizers/pesticides used during agricultural practices

Sustainable Development Impacts

As agro-biodiversity is the backbone for the sustainable development of agriculture, food security and poverty alleviation in Nepal, it is a national responsibility to conserve, maintain and sustainable use of the available diversity. It is also becoming important issues to realize the role of local communities in maintaining and managing local genetic materials for food and nutrition security.

Scalability

Farmers in Nepal are having a hard time to sustain agriculture under the prevailing tough conditions. Community-led initiatives like the establishment of community seed banks are an effective platform to maintain traditional crop varieties and improved seed management for future usage, especially for achieving food security. The government and concerned agencies should come forward to strengthen and institutionalize the community-led initiatives to sustain agriculture in the country.

 

Replicability

Seed banks contribute enormously to food security by ensuring the timely availability of seeds of useful crops. They encourage the cultivation and consumption of these crops, benefiting both producers and consumers. Farmers in most of the villages of Jumla district, like many other rural farming villages, also faced multiple challenges to sustain the farming profession. The loss of local rice varieties including Marsi, Beans, Uwa continued unabated while the dependency on imported hybrid seeds grew. The introduction of hybrid and improved seeds had an adverse impact on local genetic resources including local rice seeds landraces that were going extinct.Thus this initiative can be strengthened encouraging farmers to get together, with each of them bringing seeds of different neglected species and exchanging them with those from their neighbors and there is high need of replicability in other villages of Jumla as well as other districts of Nepal.

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August 7, 2017

Palau Placeholder
Palau

Restoring and reviving abandoned taro fields to strengthen buffer for sedimentation

About the Implementing organization

Name: Ngara Ekil (Traditional women's group)p

Country: Palau

Year of establishment: 1950

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Women’s association or organization, Indigenous group or organization, Other

Description

It has been studied in Palau that the traditional management of taro fields that have been in practice for about 800 years, are an added measure (next to mangroves) that can buffer sedimentation from entering the reefs. This is an innovative farming method that is different from the usual mono-cropping or industrialized agriculture farming methods that are often the cause for further land and environmental degradation. And Palau as a small island state (SIDS), these traditional management practices have been tested and trailed over a long period of time that has refined a farming method to be compatible with its fragile and connected environment.

Nature Element

Wetlands / Rivers

Type of Action

Restoration / Sustainable use

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security / Health

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

    

Environmental Impacts

1.4 hectares of land or approximately 14,000 square meters of land applying sustainable agriculture and water management practices. The initiative also aims to protect these taro fields to prevent them from being altered or falling victim to development projects. The women hope to have these agro-ecosystems intact.

Sustainable Development Impacts

An increase of taro fields and an increase of taro crops has resulted from this initiative. Furthermore, the increase in community participation, particularly the women of Ngardmau State, should be noted. With the taro fields now functional again, the women are now looking towards value-added products as well as delving into the tourism industry to promote low-impact, high-value tourism in Ngardmau and the whole of Palau as well.

Scalability

It is important to note that taro fields' restoration has expanded to 4 more States since 2015 when this initiative was already being implemented. The efforts are based on the study of taro fields having the capacity to buffer sediments from going further down to the reefs. Moreover, the expansion is also an effort to address food security plans in Palau.

Replicability

Taro field management in Palau is a traditional farming method, but it is innovate in a way that has stood the test of time by being able to work in harmony with the natural environment. This initiative should be replicated and shared with the rest of the world in efforts to combat land degradation and even restore degraded land.

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August 7, 2017

Kenya Placeholder
Kenya

Art for Conservation Education

About the Implementing organization

Name: The Laikipian

Country: Kenya

Year of establishment: 2013

Type of organization: Community-based association or organization, Community enterprise or business

Description

The Laikipian will creatively inform the target audience on the increasing cases of environment and natural resources degradation and other vices such as poaching. Our art will highlight the dangers of such human activities to the perpetrators as well as future generations.

The destruction of habitat and the extinction of wildlife is a global phenomenon that cannot only be tackled on a local scale as it is fuelled by destructive behaviour that is not limited to one country alone and therefore a need to use of a universal language-art.

Our Art for Conservation has five education platforms: ’ Hunt Me Not’ conservation comic series, ‘Let’s Go Wild’ kids colour book, interactive conservation board game, environmental education posters and use of brand names and slogans to raise awareness on conservation

Each product will explain how conservation efforts can be combined with the daily lives of ordinary people, so that they can develop creative solutions and play a key role in mitigating the effects of environmental degradation. Each product has a different primary audience: the colouring book is aimed at young children, the game is made for general public, and the comic is more appropriate for teenagers and adults. If a new generation is empowered through conservation education and act now, they will construct a solid foundation on which to build a path for a better future.

Nature Element

Forests / Wetlands / Rivers / Wildlife

Type of Action

Awareness and education

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Renewable energy / Climate action

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

    

Environmental Impacts

Conservation of Chonnir forest has led to improving the moisture content of soil. Water was drying up affecting not only the Somdal village but the surrounding two villages which depend on the water source from this forest. Water to terrace paddy field was depleting resulting to abandoning of many terrace fields. Conservation of this forest has recharged water sources and the paddy fields have been reclaimed after 7-8 years.

This forest patch is connected to Patkai hills in Nagaland through Tingshong forest.No hunting is allowed in this forest. Therefore, villagers started spotting wild animals which were almost vanished from the surrounding forest due to heavy degradation of forest and habitat loss.

Improvement of water supply to the village compound has improved sanitation and cleanliness of the village. This also reduced the workload of women as generally women take the responsibility to fetch water from the ponds if it were not supplied in the compound due to lack of water supply source.

Sustainable Development Impacts

1. Recharging the water source and therefore enabling the villagers to reclaim terrace field has helped in ensuring food security to villagers.
2. With the retention of moisture around the village, there has been an improvement in homestead gardening. Livestock keeping has improved which provided supplementary income as well as better nutrition to the families.

3. There has been an improvement in production of NTFPs which in turn has boosted the skills and income of women groups as they developed skills on value addition and sell the products.
4. Improvement in water source helped the village to improve sanitation and cleanliness in the village.

5. Less availability of forest land for cultivation and other livelihood needs made villagers to diversify their economic activities. Non-farm based activities such as weaving, petty business, food processing, animal husbandry, handicraft etc. have provided sustainable alternative livelihood options to this indigenous community.

Scalability

Protection of large scale of forest patch in the village which has less land for cultivation was a big challenge. However, diversification of economic activities from farm-based to non-farm based activities made it possible to protect the forest. This forest being part of forest Patkai hill in Nagaland forms an animal corridor through Tingshong forest. Protecting contagious forest in the neighboring villages will protect the watershed of Iril river -one of the main rivers of Manipur which falls into the Loktak Lake which is one of the biggest freshwater lakes in India.

Replicability

Neighboring villages of Somdal cultivate marijuana on the hillock after clearing the forest. The indiscriminate use of chemical fertilizers and weedicides has polluted the soil and surrounding area as much as that the stream flowing from and through the hillock has been contaminated and the water has been made unfit for drinking. As such neighboring villages namely Phalee and L Phungdhar are depending on the water source from Chonnir forest and taking permission from Somdal village. Somdal village is talking to these neighboring villages to plan themselves as they cannot share the water forever. Neighboring villages have also started to feel the impact of forest depletion and unsustainable land use practices. These villages can develop community-based rules and regulation for the management of their degraded forest and plan to restore the health of the forest as has been done by Somdal. These villages have the same landscape, land use pattern and practices and culture.

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August 7, 2017

Niger Placeholder
Niger

Drip Irrigation Technologies for Small Holders

About the Implementing organization

Name: Rural Infrastructure Services for Under-Served Population (RISEUP)

Country: Nigeria

Year of establishment: 2012

Type of organization: Other

Description

Over 95% of poor farmers depend on rainfall which at best is unpredictable, seasonal and very low in many regions.
New technological development and commercialization of irrigation has been directed toward large-scale and well-resourced farmers. However, the majority of the world’s farmers are resource poor smallholders who are not able to afford this high-end technology. Drip irrigation is affordable and has the potential to be the most efficient irrigation technology when evaluated in terms of crop production per unit of water consumed. Both at the demonstration farm and the participants farms drip irrigation was very cost-effective.

The project integrated drip irrigation technology as a part of a sustainable, economic, social, and environmentally certified vegetable value chain. The system has the proven potential to increase crop yield, increase soil and water conservation, improve crop quality, reduce environmental degradation and increase farmers’ income. It also gives farmers the opportunity to grow and sell crops out of season, bringing huge economic benefits to the farmers, their families and the wider community.
Farmers reported yield increases of roughly 50 to 90 % and decreases in water use of from 40 to 80 % compared to traditional surface irrigation systems. Farmers found the drip systems much easier and less time consuming to operate than traditional surface irrigation systems, particularly where water supplies were limited.

 

Nature Element

Drylands

Type of Action

Sustainable use / Mainstreaming into sectors / Awareness and education

Sustainable Development Element

Jobs and livelihoods / Food security / Water security

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s)

    

Environmental Impacts

Drip irrigation offers an energy efficient and affordable technology with additional crop and water management services. Low pressure drip irrigation holds tremendous potential to increase efficiency, reduce water and fertilizer use, extend growing seasons and improve productivity.

Sustainable Development Impacts

The project introduced different sizes of drip irrigation systems. The system comes in 1/4 acres units. Farmers can buy number of units adequate to cover part or whole of the farm and get more units at a later date.

Scalability

Introduction of Drip irrigation can be expanded nation-wide. Farmers associated with this project have recorded increase in income and livelihood.
The attractive features that are important to smallholders include; low investment cost, suitability for various farm sizes at about the same cost per unit of area served, rapid return on investment and simple inexpensive maintenance.

Replicability

The success of the project has awakened the interests of other farmers who did not participated in the project. The project has helped a number of farmers install drip systems on their farms.

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