Equator Prize 2024: Nature for Climate Action

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS - CLOSED

O Prémio Equatorial deste ano irá reconhecer iniciativas inovadoras de povos indígenas e comunidades locais que demonstrem abordagens para a implementação do recém-aprovado Quadro Global para a Biodiversidade, com ênfase em soluções baseadas na natureza que alcancem o desenvolvimento sustentável local. As iniciativas vencedoras serão homenageadas pelos seus sucessos na proteção, recuperação e/ou gestão sustentável da natureza para resultados de desenvolvimento positivos para a natureza.

Equator Prize 2024: Nature for Climate Action

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS - CLOSED

COVERIGM

O Prémio Equatorial deste ano irá reconhecer iniciativas inovadoras de povos indígenas e comunidades locais que demonstrem abordagens para a implementação do recém-aprovado Quadro Global para a Biodiversidade, com ênfase em soluções baseadas na natureza que alcancem o desenvolvimento sustentável local. As iniciativas vencedoras serão homenageadas pelos seus sucessos na proteção, recuperação e/ou gestão sustentável da natureza para resultados de desenvolvimento positivos para a natureza.

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The Equator Initiative provides opportunities for indigenous peoples and local communities around the world to address the challenges of land degradation, biodiversity conservation and livelihood improvement in a socially equitable manner.

The Equator Initiative provides opportunities for indigenous peoples and local communities around the world to address the challenges of land degradation, biodiversity conservation and livelihood improvement in a socially equitable manner.

The Equator Initiative provides opportunities for indigenous peoples and local communities around the world to address the challenges of land degradation, biodiversity conservation and livelihood improvement in a socially equitable manner.

How can you participate?


Prémio Equatorial

The Equator Prize, organized by the Equator Initiative within the United Nations Development Programme, is awarded biennially to recognize outstanding community efforts to reduce poverty through the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. 


Prémio Equatorial

The Equator Prize, organized by the Equator Initiative within the United Nations Development Programme, is awarded biennially to recognize outstanding community efforts to reduce poverty through the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. 


Prémio Equatorial

The Equator Prize, organized by the Equator Initiative within the United Nations Development Programme, is awarded biennially to recognize outstanding community efforts to reduce poverty through the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity.


Media Center

Explore our media center, discover hundreds of pictures and videos from the local communities and indigenous peoples.


Media Center

Explore our media center, discover hundreds of pictures and videos from the local communities and indigenous peoples.


Media Center

Explore our media center, discover hundreds of pictures and videos from the local communities and indigenous peoples. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip.


Knowledge Portal

We believe in the power of knowledge sharing. Equator Initiative's E-Library provides a series of publications, case studies and other resources specifically created to be shared among the communities, partners and government.


Knowledge Portal

We believe in the power of knowledge sharing. Equator Initiative's E-Library provides a series of publications, case studies and other resources specifically created to be shared among the communities, partners and government.


Knowledge Portal

We believe in the power of knowledge sharing. Equator Initiative's E-Library provides a series of publications, case studies and other resources specifically created to be shared among the communities, partners and government.

Join our community today!

Follow us on social media to get the latest news!

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Featured Community: Advocating for Global Change

Nashulai Maasai Conservancy

Entre as primeiras áreas de conservação detidas e geridas por indígenas na África Oriental, a Nashulai Maasai Conservancy está na vanguarda de uma mudança de paradigma para um modelo de conservação de utilização mista.

Esta área protegida de 2 400 hectares constitui um importante corredor ecológico no Maasai Mara e tem atraído elefantes, zebras, girafas, leões e muitas outras espécies.

Entre as primeiras áreas de conservação detidas e geridas por indígenas na África Oriental, a Nashulai Maasai Conservancy está na vanguarda de uma mudança de paradigma para um modelo de conservação de utilização mista.

Esta área protegida de 2 400 hectares constitui um importante corredor ecológico no Maasai Mara e tem atraído elefantes, zebras, girafas, leões e muitas outras espécies.

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Thirteenth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the CBD

Equator Initiative at Thirteenth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity The 13th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP13) brings together 10,000 representatives of governments, international organizations and stakeholders in Cancun, Mexico, to advance the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and the Aichi Biodiversity Targets. The knowledge and practices of Indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs) are key to safeguarding our planet’s species while achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. The Equator Initiative, the GEF-Small Grants Programme (SGP), the CBD Secretariat, and partners, host a six-day program of work at COP13 to discuss and share best practices of IPLCs, and develop capacities of Equator Prize winners and SGP grantees. The “Muuch’tambal Summit”, promoted by the Government of Mexico and the CBD, highlights the experiences of IPLCs and their contributions of traditional knowledge and cultural diversity to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. Day 1 – Preparatory workshop for Equator Prize winners/SGP grantees participating at COP 13 – 6 Dec. 2016   The preparatory workshop for Equator Prize winners /SGP grantees attending COP13 was meant to be a recap session focused on the content shared through the online course, a preparatory session prior to the Article 8J negotiations on 7 December, and served as a capacity building session to ensure all Equator Prize winners/ SGP grantees are ready to present on their work on 8 December, at the Rio Conventions Pavilion. The workshop was also an opportunity to prepare material for the 15-year celebration of the Equator Initiative and the 25-year celebration of the GEF-Small Grants Programme.   To read more, click here Day 2 – Article 8J negotiations of the Convention on Biological Diversity- 7 Dec 2016 Representatives of 18 Equator Prize winning communities/ SGP grantees were invited to follow the CBD COP13 negotiations on Article 8J focused on promoting national legislations that respect, preserve, and maintain innovations and practices of indigenous and local communities embodying traditional lifestyles relevant for the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity; that promote their wider application with the approval and involvement of the holders of such knowledge, innovations and practices; and that encourage the equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the utilization of such knowledge, innovations and practices. The day concluded with a recap session over a work dinner with all Equator Prize winners/ SGP grantees to analyze Article 8J negotiations and their impacts on the Equator Prize winners/ SGP grantees’ work.   To read more, click here Day 3 – Indigenous People and Local Communities Day @ Rio Conventions Pavilion -8 December 2016 Equator Initiative, GEF- SGP and partners, hosted the “Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs) Day” at the Rio Conventions Pavilion. The intention of the day is to provide a platform to showcase indigenous and local community voices and perspectives, and to serve as an effective bridge connecting policy makers, academics, private sector, civil society and the media with on-the-ground practitioners. Organized by Equator Initiative, GEF- Small Grants Programme and partners, the day consisted of a series of dialogues and panel discussions (5 in total, followed by a reception), to share knowledge, exchange best practices, inform policy, and enhance capacity. Topics addressed mirrored the main themes of COP 13 and SDGs, while focusing on local solutions for the protection and sustainable use of biological resources. The reception was the first event in a series of celebrations to mark the 15th anniversary of the Equator Initiative and the 25th anniversary of the GEF-Small Grants Programme.   To read more, click here  Day 4 – Field Visit to Maya Indigenous Community – 9 Dec. 2016 Hosted by the Mexican government, the visit aimed to provide IPLCS attending COP13 with an opportunity to interact and exchange ideas and experiences with an indigenous community on the thematic topics of agriculture, fisheries, forestry and tourism. To read more, click here         Days 5 and 6: Summit “Muuchtanbal” on Indigenous Experiences, Traditional Knowledge and Biological and cultural Diversity 10 – 11 December 2016 Hosted by the Mexican government and the CBD, the aim of the Summit “Muuchtanbal”, was to present and share experiences from indigenous peoples and local communities, Parties, International Organizations, on the contributions of traditional knowledge, and the cultural diversity across sectors including agriculture, fisheries, forestry and tourism, for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. The Summit concluded with a regional cultural presentation and celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB). Conclusions were presented at the plenary of COP13.   To read more, click here  
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Kauhale ‘Ōiwi Dialogues: Honolulu, USA – 2016

Kauhale ‘Ōiwi Dialogues: Honolulu, USA – 2016 The Community Kauhale ‘Ōiwi is a peer-to-peer meeting space at IUCN WCC that provides an opportunity for local and indigenous leaders to exchange knowledge and best practices in sustainable environmental management. Leveraging the unique partnerships of the Equator Initiative, the Kauhale aims to position local advocacy and knowledge sharing within the larger policy dialogues on conservation and sustainable development. To see an overview of Community Kauhale ‘Ōiwi events at WCC, please click here. The Community Kauhale ‘Ōiwi is a peer-to-peer meeting space at IUCN WCC that provides an opportunity for local and indigenous leaders to exchange knowledge and best practices in sustainable environmental management. Leveraging the unique partnerships of the Equator Initiative, the Kauhale aims to position local advocacy and knowledge sharing within the larger policy dialogues on conservation and sustainable development. To see an overview of Community Kauhale ‘Ōiwi events at WCC, please click here. Day 1 – The Sustainable Development Goals The Equator Initiative opened its Community Kauhale with a traditional Hawaiian Awa Ceremony, honoring and welcoming Equator Prize winners, partners, and friends to the space, which would be used as a home for indigenous peoples and local communities, as well as a meeting hub for all IUCN World Conservation Congress (WCC) attendees. The session on Localizing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) sought to explore how SDGs can be implemented to address local realities and needs of local communities and indigenous peoples; to explore multiple perspectives on how to localize the SDGs; and discuss how efforts at the local level can be linked and integrated to global policies. READ MORE > Day 2 – ICCAs and Protected Areas This session on ICCAs and Protected Areas provided an overview of indigenous peoples and community conserved territories and areas. The intention was to exchange best practices and knowledge on the governance of such areas, the threats and challenges of ICCAs and protected areas, and the relationship with mainstream conservation efforts. Terence Hay-Edie, from UNDP-GEF Small Grants Programme facilitated the session. The Community to Community Exchanges: Strengthening Networks was an opportunity to share experiences of existing networks involving indigenous peoples and local communities, and the importance of community-to-community exchange in learning, scaling out work, and network building. Speakers discussed methodologies used to enable community-to-community exchange, how and why the networks were developed, the challenges they faced, and the components needed to ensure growth and relevance in a digital age. READ MORE > Day 3 – Partnerships The session on Accessing Global Financing, Funding Opportunities for Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities was a roundtable discussion that brought together representatives from key global funding institutions to learn about what financing options are available to indigenous peoples and local communities, and for financing institutions to hear how financing opportunities can be expanded, increased and enhanced to better target indigenous peoples and local communities’ needs and aspirations. Alejandra Pero, Coordinator of the Equator Initiative’s WIN-Network, moderated the session. READ MORE >  Day 4 – Communications Fourth in a series of dialogues on the ethical use of Digital Technology, the session focused on the advantages of using newly available digital tools, such as drones, smart phones, video games, a GIS to map, monitor and protect indigenous territories from illegal activities, but also the threats and challenges that accompany their use when into the wrong hands. The Media Training: How to Tell you Story session was an opportunity for all WCC attendees to learn how to communicate more effectively, using communications tools for advocacy and mobilizing for change. Co-led by Sean Southey from PCI Media Impact and Joshua Cooper, from the Hawaii Institute for Human Rights, the session focused on tools and methodologies used to tell a compelling story and attract media attention. READ MORE >
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Dialogues: Paris, France – 2015

Dialogues: Paris, France – 2015 Representatives of the 21 Equator Prize 2015 winning initiatives flew to Paris, France for two weeks of events associated with the United Nations Conference on Climate Change (COP 21). Community members started their visit with an event at the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) on 26 November and then participated in five days of World Indigenous Network community dialogues hosted at both the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and Espace Krajcberg. During the dialogues, participants developed their elevator pitch, shared best practices, and heard from representatives of OECD, Kimberley Land Council, the Global Environment Facility Small Grants Programme (GEF SGP), and The Nature Conservancy. Topics included negotiating with governments, land tenure, promoting the sustainable development goals, and practical skills in marketing, fundraising and photography. Following the dialogues, the communities participated in COP 21 side events alongside other indigenous peoples and local communities. Day 1 – Welcome & Introductions The Paris Community Dialogues commenced with a warm welcome by the Deputy Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation (OECD). During the first day of community dialogues, participants attended a multi-stakeholder luncheon hosted by the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Three past Equator Prize winners joined the first day of dialogues to share their experiences after becoming prize winners.     To read more, click here Day 2 – Climate Negotiations & Elevator Pitches The second day of dialogues began with presentations by Isabel Aranda of the UNFCCCC Secretariat and Johnson Cerda of Conservation International. The two speakers provided historical context to the COP 21 negotiations highlighting the positive inclusion of indigenous peoples but the necessity to secure greater attention. Participants received information on the side events at which their participation could help inform global policy. Winners then assembled into thematic groups and offered peer feedback to hone elevator pitches.     To read more, click here Day 3 – Community Statements & The GEF Small Grants Programme The community dialogues continued at a new venue, L’Espace Krajcberg, where participants enjoyed a sculpture collection created from burnt Amazonian trees. Guest speaker, Terence Hay-Edie, described the Global Environment Facility Small Grants Programme and encouraged all Equator Prize winners to apply. The remainder of the communities presented their elevator pitches and received feedback. Time was devoted to themed clusters crafting statements to be presented at the Equator Prize 2015 Award Ceremony.     To read more, click here  Day 4 – Savanna Burning Institute, RARE, and Social Marketing While one member of each initiative attended the first day of events at the Climate Generations Space at COP21, the other participated in another full day of community dialogues. Guest speakers came from the Kimberely Land Council and the United Nations University to share the innovative work of the Savanna Burning Initiative. Facilitator Japy Silapan also explained his work at RARE and guided activities exploring the use of social marketing to shift behavioral norms affecting conservation efforts. The day concluded with cluster groups finalizing a first draft of their community statements.     To read more, click here Days 5 – Presentation of the Declarations and Global Greengrants Fund Workshop  The Community Dialogues and Workshops continued at L’Espace Krajcberg on Wednesday. To start off the day, winners from four thematic groups – Forests, Land Rights, Adaptation, and Sustainable Livelihoods – presented statements that will be shared at the Equator Prize Award Ceremony and received feedback from the other award winners. Global Greengrants Fund led a workshop with three indigenous youth leaders who described their experiences. A discussion on how to involve youth in community and indigenous activism followed. In the afternoon, many of the winners spent the afternoon exploring the Indigenous Peoples’ Pavilion at Le Bourget.   To read more, click here Days 6 – Events at Rio Pavilion at COP21  Equator Prize winners spent the day at the Rio Conventions Pavilion of the COP21 Climate Generations Space, to take part in the UNDP-hosted “Day for Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities.” The morning session included a panel discussion on the impact of local-national dialogues on climate change on gender-responsive climate action. The afternoon session included three consecutive panels with Equator Prize winners and multiple stakeholders on community responses in the face of conflict; local actions for climate resilience; and the role of protected areas in climate change mitigation and adaptation. In the evening, a reception was held for event participants to meet the Equator Prize 2015 winners. To read more, click here Days 7 – Solutions to Climate Change: The Power of Local Action An afternoon seminar entitled, “Solutions to Climate Change: The Power of Local Action” was held Friday at Université Panthéon Sorbonne. Bringing together past and present Equator Prize winners, scholars, photographers, students, and guests, the event highlighted local approaches to climate change mitigation and adaptation. Following an afternoon of learning and sharing, participants enjoyed a dinner reception.     To read more, click here Days 8 – Closing Session & Next Steps   A morning closing session was held for Equator Prize winners at L’Italia in Bocca in Bercy Village. Bringing together community representatives and Equator Initiative staff for the final time, the event enabled participants to reflect on their experiences in Paris and to begin to think about leveraging the Equator Prize for future work. The session concluded with a farewell lunch.     To read more, click here       Discover Solutions Database Forum E-learning   Equator Blog [do_widget id=rpwe_widget-3] About Equator Initiative  Contact Us Follow Us:       
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af3f8065061498746f32bf57c841809e

Base de dados de soluções baseadas na natureza

Saiba como as comunidades locais e os povos indígenas de destaque tornam possível a realização dos Objectivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável das Nações Unidas através de acções baseadas na natureza.

Base de dados de soluções baseadas na natureza

Saiba como as comunidades locais e os povos indígenas de destaque tornam possível a realização dos Objectivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável das Nações Unidas através de acções baseadas na natureza.

 

Base de dados de soluções baseadas na natureza

Saiba como as comunidades locais e os povos indígenas de destaque tornam possível a realização dos Objectivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável das Nações Unidas através de acções baseadas na natureza.

 

Equator blogs and stories

RED TICCA “Territorios de Vida en Argentina”

The ICCA Network ‘Territories of Life in Argentina’ (RED TICCA) is an autonomous political organization of Indigenous peoples for the recognition and application of Indigenous rights and the defense of their territories at the national level. RED TICCA’s work promotes political recognition of Indigenous peoples as bearers of a millenary wisdom regarding the protection of nature and ancestral guardians of the territory. The network is groundbreaking in its ability to bridge communities throughout the country to achieve food sovereignty, access to clean water, improved public health, intergenerational equity and gender equality. The communities have also protected their ancestral lands by joining the global ICCA Consortium, a global movement to protect the territories of Indigenous Peoples and local communities (a.k.a “Territories of Life”). RED TICCA has connected and empowered the Indigenous peoples of Argentina and has reaffirmed their ownership over their territories, culture, and natural resources – a historic step for Indigenous rights and recognition in Argentina.
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Instituto Zág

Instituto Zág is an Indigenous youth-led organization whose key activity is the reforestation and preservation of traditional knowledge around the Araucaria tree, known as Zág. The Zág tree holds sacred and symbolic value to the Xokleng Peoples, but is currently on the verge of extinction due to centuries of uncontrolled exploitation. Reclaiming the traditional territory of the Xokleng Peoples in the State of Santa Catarina, where the Zág tree thrives, is one of the most emblematic struggles for Indigenous rights in Brazil, and in the world today. With only 2% of the Zág tree’s original habitat remaining, the reforestation efforts of Instituto Zág are crucial for the survival of the Araucaria and of the continuation of ancestral wisdom. These efforts include removing invasive trees, valuing ancestral traditions, and conducting educational activities with diverse audiences to safeguard the Araucaria tree as a source of nutrition, medicine, and cultural identity. Through its actions, Instituto Zág recognizes the interdependence between the Zág tree and the Xokleng people.
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Membros que recebem o nosso boletim informativo

123

Presences world countries/regions

285

Comunidades locais e indígenas

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